2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163729
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Vulnerability in Living With a Long-Term Urinary Catheter
Author(s):
Wilde, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Wilde, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Turners Falls, Massachusetts, USA, email: mary_wilde@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe and interpret the lived experience of long-term urinary catheterization in community-dwelling people. Research questions: The study was designed to understand what everyday living was like for people with urinary catheters. Areas of interest included how they felt about the catheter, how it affected their everyday activities, and how it related to their other medical problems. It was of particular interest to find out whether people experienced the catheter as a stigma or whether it affected the way they looked at their bodies. Framework: Embodiment was the theoretical framework, and Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology provided the philosophical foundation. van Manen's methodology was used, combining hermeneutic (interpretive) dimensions to phenomenological descriptions of lived experiences. Methods: A phenomenological study was conducted. The community-dwelling sample was composed of 9 females and 5 males, ranging in age from 35-95, and they lived in urban, suburban, and rural settings. Ten participants were recruited through home care agencies and 4 through a urological practice of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Primary data were provided by audio taped and transcribed interviews conducted in the homes of participants, some of whom were interviewed twice. Results & conclusions: The primary nature of the experience of living with the catheter was one of a tension between acknowledgment that the catheter was a "part of me" and feelings of alienation when the catheter was experienced as a stigma or a problem. Whenever things were not going well with the catheter, the taken-for-grantedness of the catheter that was in the background would rise to the foreground. Otherwise, it was experienced as a "part of me." Vulnerability was experienced when people felt ashamed or stigmatized because of a loss of bodily control that the catheter symbolized, the visibility of the catheter, and catheter-related changes associated with their sexuality. People also felt embarrassed during the exposure of catheter insertion, especially in relation to male/female sensitivities. Implications for nursing practice: People may feel more stigmatized by the catheter than nurses realize. Even though urinary catheters are commonly used, it is not commonplace technology to the people wearing them. Nurses need to be sensitive to the possibility that catheters can be visible reminders of illness and vulnerability, and clients may be helped by camouflaging their catheters. Also, nurses may need to introduce the topic of sexual intercourse and the catheter because their patients may hesitate to do so.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVulnerability in Living With a Long-Term Urinary Catheteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilde, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Wilde, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Turners Falls, Massachusetts, USA, email: mary_wilde@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163729-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe and interpret the lived experience of long-term urinary catheterization in community-dwelling people. Research questions: The study was designed to understand what everyday living was like for people with urinary catheters. Areas of interest included how they felt about the catheter, how it affected their everyday activities, and how it related to their other medical problems. It was of particular interest to find out whether people experienced the catheter as a stigma or whether it affected the way they looked at their bodies. Framework: Embodiment was the theoretical framework, and Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology provided the philosophical foundation. van Manen's methodology was used, combining hermeneutic (interpretive) dimensions to phenomenological descriptions of lived experiences. Methods: A phenomenological study was conducted. The community-dwelling sample was composed of 9 females and 5 males, ranging in age from 35-95, and they lived in urban, suburban, and rural settings. Ten participants were recruited through home care agencies and 4 through a urological practice of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Primary data were provided by audio taped and transcribed interviews conducted in the homes of participants, some of whom were interviewed twice. Results & conclusions: The primary nature of the experience of living with the catheter was one of a tension between acknowledgment that the catheter was a "part of me" and feelings of alienation when the catheter was experienced as a stigma or a problem. Whenever things were not going well with the catheter, the taken-for-grantedness of the catheter that was in the background would rise to the foreground. Otherwise, it was experienced as a "part of me." Vulnerability was experienced when people felt ashamed or stigmatized because of a loss of bodily control that the catheter symbolized, the visibility of the catheter, and catheter-related changes associated with their sexuality. People also felt embarrassed during the exposure of catheter insertion, especially in relation to male/female sensitivities. Implications for nursing practice: People may feel more stigmatized by the catheter than nurses realize. Even though urinary catheters are commonly used, it is not commonplace technology to the people wearing them. Nurses need to be sensitive to the possibility that catheters can be visible reminders of illness and vulnerability, and clients may be helped by camouflaging their catheters. Also, nurses may need to introduce the topic of sexual intercourse and the catheter because their patients may hesitate to do so.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:48Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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