2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163730
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Consumer's Perspective of Quality Health Care
Author(s):
DePalma, Judith
Author Details:
Judith DePalma, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jdepalma@ons.org
Abstract:
Measuring quality of health care is especially important with the current pressure to provide more efficient and less costly services. Proof of quality is being demanded of health care systems by many legislative bodies and regulatory agencies but no standard definition exists. Health care providers often assume that they know what consumers value, expect, and what promotes consumer satisfaction with health care experiences. Therefore, a lack of consumer involvement in the determination of quality indicators has existed. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of quality and non-quality health care in an acute care setting from the consumer's perspective, through the relating of critical incidents. The qualitative method employed, Critical Incident Technique (CIT), was adapted from the field of marketing that has used this methodology extensively to study service encounters. Ninety-two individuals provided 127 interviews, quality (n=55) and non-quality (n=72) experiences. Three broad categories and eleven subcategories emerged from the narratives that identified key aspects of quality and non-quality in health care experiences. The broad categories were: Core Expected Services, Caregivers' Attributes and Behaviors, and Organizational Processes. Core Expected Services included the subcategories of lack of competence, pain management and response to service delivery failure. Caregivers' Attributes and Behaviors included attitude, communication, availability, individualized care, response to special needs and extraordinary behaviors. Organizational Processes included timeliness and insurance-based occurrences. Nurses were included in 81% of the incidents and physicians in 35%. Nurses, in situations where service delivery failure had occurred, were able and actually expected to compensate for the failure. The most frequently occurring combination of caregivers' attributes and behaviors was attitude, communication, availability, and individualized care. These attributes were addressed in an average of 60% of the quality incidents and 47% of the non-quality incidents. Many of the subcategories were similar to those derived from marketing studies, supporting the assumption that critical aspects of perceived service quality are comparable across all service industries. Results from this study can be utilized by the healthcare team at the bedside, educators, and hospital and nursing administrators to promote care that the consumer values.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Consumer's Perspective of Quality Health Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDePalma, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith DePalma, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jdepalma@ons.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163730-
dc.description.abstractMeasuring quality of health care is especially important with the current pressure to provide more efficient and less costly services. Proof of quality is being demanded of health care systems by many legislative bodies and regulatory agencies but no standard definition exists. Health care providers often assume that they know what consumers value, expect, and what promotes consumer satisfaction with health care experiences. Therefore, a lack of consumer involvement in the determination of quality indicators has existed. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of quality and non-quality health care in an acute care setting from the consumer's perspective, through the relating of critical incidents. The qualitative method employed, Critical Incident Technique (CIT), was adapted from the field of marketing that has used this methodology extensively to study service encounters. Ninety-two individuals provided 127 interviews, quality (n=55) and non-quality (n=72) experiences. Three broad categories and eleven subcategories emerged from the narratives that identified key aspects of quality and non-quality in health care experiences. The broad categories were: Core Expected Services, Caregivers' Attributes and Behaviors, and Organizational Processes. Core Expected Services included the subcategories of lack of competence, pain management and response to service delivery failure. Caregivers' Attributes and Behaviors included attitude, communication, availability, individualized care, response to special needs and extraordinary behaviors. Organizational Processes included timeliness and insurance-based occurrences. Nurses were included in 81% of the incidents and physicians in 35%. Nurses, in situations where service delivery failure had occurred, were able and actually expected to compensate for the failure. The most frequently occurring combination of caregivers' attributes and behaviors was attitude, communication, availability, and individualized care. These attributes were addressed in an average of 60% of the quality incidents and 47% of the non-quality incidents. Many of the subcategories were similar to those derived from marketing studies, supporting the assumption that critical aspects of perceived service quality are comparable across all service industries. Results from this study can be utilized by the healthcare team at the bedside, educators, and hospital and nursing administrators to promote care that the consumer values.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:49Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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