2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163731
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meta-Synthesis: Implications for Nursing Practice
Author(s):
Beck, Cheryl
Author Details:
Cheryl Beck, DSNC, FAAN, Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Connecticut, USA, email: cheryl.beck@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Misconceptions about the generalizability of qualitative research findings prevent the use of these valuable findings to their fullest extent. The results of qualitative research may not be taken seriously because of the erroneous belief that these findings are not generalizable. These results are generalizable but not in the same manner as quantitative findings. In qualitative research, generalizations are naturalistic, that is, generalizations are made about particulars (Stake & Trumbull, 1982). Meta-synthesis can facilitate the generalization of qualitative research and aid in the accumulation of knowledge from individual qualitative research studies. Eisner (1998) purports that accumulation of qualitative knowledge is not so much about knowing more but instead about having increased perspective from which to know. A meta-synthesis of qualitative findings yields not just an accumulation of knowledge, but more importantly, a transformation of understanding (Sandelowski, 1997). The aim of a qualitative meta-synthesis is to enlarge the interpretation and understanding of findings and not to average results into an effect size as is done in a meta-analysis. In this symposium the results of five different meta-syntheses will be presented with the emphasis on the implications for nursing practice derived from these qualitative aggregated analyses. Each of these meta-syntheses focuses on different content areas in nursing. These foci include (1) engaging in lifestyle change in chronic illness, (2) quality of life, (3) menopause and midlife, (4) mothering "other than normal" children, and (5) parenting pre-term infants. Noblit and Hare's (1988) meta-ethnographic approach was used in each meta-synthesis. Their approach is one of systematic comparison, which involves translating studies into each other. It is comprised of a series of seven phases that overlap and repeat as the meta-synthesis progresses. These seven phases include: getting started, deciding what is relevant to the initial interest, reading the studies, gathering important metaphors, phrases, and/or concepts to juxtapose them, translating studies into one another, synthesizing translations, and expressing the synthesis. Attendees of this symposium will not only become aware of the value of meta-syntheses for clinical practice but also learn in depth one method to aggregate qualitative findings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeta-Synthesis: Implications for Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Cherylen_US
dc.author.detailsCheryl Beck, DSNC, FAAN, Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Connecticut, USA, email: cheryl.beck@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163731-
dc.description.abstractMisconceptions about the generalizability of qualitative research findings prevent the use of these valuable findings to their fullest extent. The results of qualitative research may not be taken seriously because of the erroneous belief that these findings are not generalizable. These results are generalizable but not in the same manner as quantitative findings. In qualitative research, generalizations are naturalistic, that is, generalizations are made about particulars (Stake & Trumbull, 1982). Meta-synthesis can facilitate the generalization of qualitative research and aid in the accumulation of knowledge from individual qualitative research studies. Eisner (1998) purports that accumulation of qualitative knowledge is not so much about knowing more but instead about having increased perspective from which to know. A meta-synthesis of qualitative findings yields not just an accumulation of knowledge, but more importantly, a transformation of understanding (Sandelowski, 1997). The aim of a qualitative meta-synthesis is to enlarge the interpretation and understanding of findings and not to average results into an effect size as is done in a meta-analysis. In this symposium the results of five different meta-syntheses will be presented with the emphasis on the implications for nursing practice derived from these qualitative aggregated analyses. Each of these meta-syntheses focuses on different content areas in nursing. These foci include (1) engaging in lifestyle change in chronic illness, (2) quality of life, (3) menopause and midlife, (4) mothering "other than normal" children, and (5) parenting pre-term infants. Noblit and Hare's (1988) meta-ethnographic approach was used in each meta-synthesis. Their approach is one of systematic comparison, which involves translating studies into each other. It is comprised of a series of seven phases that overlap and repeat as the meta-synthesis progresses. These seven phases include: getting started, deciding what is relevant to the initial interest, reading the studies, gathering important metaphors, phrases, and/or concepts to juxtapose them, translating studies into one another, synthesizing translations, and expressing the synthesis. Attendees of this symposium will not only become aware of the value of meta-syntheses for clinical practice but also learn in depth one method to aggregate qualitative findings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:50Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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