2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163732
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Engaging in Lifestyle Change: A Meta-Synthesis
Author(s):
Gleeson-Kreig, JoAnn
Author Details:
JoAnn Gleeson-Kreig, Plattsburgh State University of New York, Department of Nursing, Plattsburgh, New York, USA, email: JoAnn.Gleeson-Kreig@plattsburgh.edu
Abstract:
With the onset of a chronic illness, individuals are often faced with prescriptions for changing lifestyle habits. Modifications of complex patterns, like those of diet and exercise, present a challenge. Qualitative methodology has been increasingly used to reveal an individual's perspective when attempting to enact self-care. As qualitative research builds, it is necessary to develop greater knowledge through aggregation of data. This meta-synthesis was undertaken to enhance understanding of the process of engaging in lifestyle change by people with chronic illness. Reciprocal translation (Noblit & Hare, 1988) was used to synthesize previous qualitative work. The find appropriate studies for inclusion, several computerized data bases were searched (CINAHL, Medline, PsychInfo, Dissertation Abstracts). To be included, the study must have had substantive content related to the perspectives of individuals with chronic illness who were considering recommended lifestyle change, employed qualitative methods, be available in English and published between the years of 1990 through 1999. Twelve studies were included in the analysis. The most common issues addressed in the 12 studies were making diet and exercise changes, steering the sample to include a predominance of subjects that had diabetes or cardiac disease. Seven studies included individuals with diabetes (Albright, 1993; Jayne, 1993; Maclean, 1991; Price, 1993; Rayman & Ellison, 1998; Sullivan & Joseph, 1998; Wdowik, Kendall, & Harris, 1997), three studies sampled people with cardiac disease (Fleury, 1993; Gulanick, Bliley, Perino, & Keough, 1998; Young, 1996) and two studies included individuals with varying chronic conditions (Lindsey, 1997; Roberson, 1992). Six themes emerged. The first, figuring it out is cognitive in nature and involves figuring out detailed information about a course of action to be initially tried, and supplementing the resources supplied by the health care provider with outside sources. The second, influence of contextual elements, addressed congruence between the social world, previous habits and the lifestyle change. The third theme, forging a fit, is a process of modifying both the recommended regimen and usual habits to meet personal needs. The fourth theme, weighing the benefits is an ongoing process of examining the value of the expected outcomes of making the lifestyle change. The fifth theme, assuming authority describes the shifting of expertise from the health care professional to the individual as independent self-management develops. The sixth theme, shifting integration represents the degree of internalization and acceptance of the new behavior. This meta-synthesis found consensus in the literature regarding aspects that seem to influence how people actively participate in lifestyle change. It negates the view that people should unquestionable comply with recommendations from health care professionals, finding that a greater level of satisfaction and performance result when the lifestyle change is internalized rather than imposed. Health care professionals need to recognize the expertise that people with chronic illness gain and remain comfortable relinquishing control.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEngaging in Lifestyle Change: A Meta-Synthesisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGleeson-Kreig, JoAnnen_US
dc.author.detailsJoAnn Gleeson-Kreig, Plattsburgh State University of New York, Department of Nursing, Plattsburgh, New York, USA, email: JoAnn.Gleeson-Kreig@plattsburgh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163732-
dc.description.abstractWith the onset of a chronic illness, individuals are often faced with prescriptions for changing lifestyle habits. Modifications of complex patterns, like those of diet and exercise, present a challenge. Qualitative methodology has been increasingly used to reveal an individual's perspective when attempting to enact self-care. As qualitative research builds, it is necessary to develop greater knowledge through aggregation of data. This meta-synthesis was undertaken to enhance understanding of the process of engaging in lifestyle change by people with chronic illness. Reciprocal translation (Noblit & Hare, 1988) was used to synthesize previous qualitative work. The find appropriate studies for inclusion, several computerized data bases were searched (CINAHL, Medline, PsychInfo, Dissertation Abstracts). To be included, the study must have had substantive content related to the perspectives of individuals with chronic illness who were considering recommended lifestyle change, employed qualitative methods, be available in English and published between the years of 1990 through 1999. Twelve studies were included in the analysis. The most common issues addressed in the 12 studies were making diet and exercise changes, steering the sample to include a predominance of subjects that had diabetes or cardiac disease. Seven studies included individuals with diabetes (Albright, 1993; Jayne, 1993; Maclean, 1991; Price, 1993; Rayman & Ellison, 1998; Sullivan & Joseph, 1998; Wdowik, Kendall, & Harris, 1997), three studies sampled people with cardiac disease (Fleury, 1993; Gulanick, Bliley, Perino, & Keough, 1998; Young, 1996) and two studies included individuals with varying chronic conditions (Lindsey, 1997; Roberson, 1992). Six themes emerged. The first, figuring it out is cognitive in nature and involves figuring out detailed information about a course of action to be initially tried, and supplementing the resources supplied by the health care provider with outside sources. The second, influence of contextual elements, addressed congruence between the social world, previous habits and the lifestyle change. The third theme, forging a fit, is a process of modifying both the recommended regimen and usual habits to meet personal needs. The fourth theme, weighing the benefits is an ongoing process of examining the value of the expected outcomes of making the lifestyle change. The fifth theme, assuming authority describes the shifting of expertise from the health care professional to the individual as independent self-management develops. The sixth theme, shifting integration represents the degree of internalization and acceptance of the new behavior. This meta-synthesis found consensus in the literature regarding aspects that seem to influence how people actively participate in lifestyle change. It negates the view that people should unquestionable comply with recommendations from health care professionals, finding that a greater level of satisfaction and performance result when the lifestyle change is internalized rather than imposed. Health care professionals need to recognize the expertise that people with chronic illness gain and remain comfortable relinquishing control.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:51Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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