2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163733
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Satisfied Self Living Well in Connected Community
Author(s):
Jacobs, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Jacobs, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: barbara.jacobs@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Background - Quality of life is a phrase used to evaluate the various domains that contribute to satisfaction with life or living the "good life" as defined by Aristotelian philosophy. Numerous quality of life (QOL) studies have been done to evaluate outcomes following medical or nursing interventions. A meta-synthesis was performed to answer the question, What generalizations can be made from qualitative nursing research that can promote an understanding of QOL that nurses can use to promote well-being in their patients? Method & Sample - Nine qualitative research studies focusing on QOL were synthesized using Noblit & Hare's meta-ethnographic approach. The nine studies included QOL of patients with leukemia, breast cancer, liver transplants, brain tumors, lung cancer, patients living in a long-term facility, a community group home, and children and adolescents of a parent receiving renal dialysis. A total of 143 persons, ranging in age from 8-82 were represented in the meta-synthesis. Results - Seven reciprocal translations of metaphors were derived form over 75 themes, categories, and concepts. The overall reciprocal translation of the synthesis is - The Satisfied Self Living Well in Connected Community. Action was related not only to the ability to do things but the actual action itself, e.g., reading, walking, and singing. Action was related to pleasure and overall well-being. Being able and well was a sense of well-being in a number of domains, e.g., physical, spiritual, social, psychological. The ability to perform the actions of life, integrating social activities, "restructuring of life perspectives", appreciating the little things were relevant. Comfort was connected to a sense of being normal, having control, physical comfort, feeling safe, and having pride. Dealing with it meant dealing with a number of different circumstances, issues, or problems. Enabling energy refers to the need for a rich source of energy from an inner personal strength and from a number of outside sources including faith, family, friends, and health care providers. Freedom was freedom to be independent, self-determining autonomous and able to physically move about. Family and friends were inextricably important to quality of life. Relationships, connectedness, integration into society, companionships and personal associations were relevant. Discussion - The "satisfied self" has the implication that knowing self and perceiving self as a rational interpretive person is essential to being able to decide whether one is satisfied or not. QOL is an individual phenomenon and perception. Living well in the metaphoric translation represents all well-being. The concept of self in context is relevant for nursing practice from the Heideggerian view of persons living in constituted worlds as "embodied" and "self-interpreting" beings having significance and value. Nurses are moral agents who have the potential to demonstrate respect for all persons by respecting each person's mattering and sense of "happiness."
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Satisfied Self Living Well in Connected Communityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Jacobs, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: barbara.jacobs@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163733-
dc.description.abstractBackground - Quality of life is a phrase used to evaluate the various domains that contribute to satisfaction with life or living the "good life" as defined by Aristotelian philosophy. Numerous quality of life (QOL) studies have been done to evaluate outcomes following medical or nursing interventions. A meta-synthesis was performed to answer the question, What generalizations can be made from qualitative nursing research that can promote an understanding of QOL that nurses can use to promote well-being in their patients? Method & Sample - Nine qualitative research studies focusing on QOL were synthesized using Noblit & Hare's meta-ethnographic approach. The nine studies included QOL of patients with leukemia, breast cancer, liver transplants, brain tumors, lung cancer, patients living in a long-term facility, a community group home, and children and adolescents of a parent receiving renal dialysis. A total of 143 persons, ranging in age from 8-82 were represented in the meta-synthesis. Results - Seven reciprocal translations of metaphors were derived form over 75 themes, categories, and concepts. The overall reciprocal translation of the synthesis is - The Satisfied Self Living Well in Connected Community. Action was related not only to the ability to do things but the actual action itself, e.g., reading, walking, and singing. Action was related to pleasure and overall well-being. Being able and well was a sense of well-being in a number of domains, e.g., physical, spiritual, social, psychological. The ability to perform the actions of life, integrating social activities, "restructuring of life perspectives", appreciating the little things were relevant. Comfort was connected to a sense of being normal, having control, physical comfort, feeling safe, and having pride. Dealing with it meant dealing with a number of different circumstances, issues, or problems. Enabling energy refers to the need for a rich source of energy from an inner personal strength and from a number of outside sources including faith, family, friends, and health care providers. Freedom was freedom to be independent, self-determining autonomous and able to physically move about. Family and friends were inextricably important to quality of life. Relationships, connectedness, integration into society, companionships and personal associations were relevant. Discussion - The "satisfied self" has the implication that knowing self and perceiving self as a rational interpretive person is essential to being able to decide whether one is satisfied or not. QOL is an individual phenomenon and perception. Living well in the metaphoric translation represents all well-being. The concept of self in context is relevant for nursing practice from the Heideggerian view of persons living in constituted worlds as "embodied" and "self-interpreting" beings having significance and value. Nurses are moral agents who have the potential to demonstrate respect for all persons by respecting each person's mattering and sense of "happiness."en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:52Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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