2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163734
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Road Through Oz and the Journey Home: A Meta-Synthesis
Author(s):
Matarese, Colette
Author Details:
Colette Matarese, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: colette.matarese@uconn.edu
Abstract:
All women, barring premature death, severe pathophysiology, or surgical intervention will experience menopause. Numerous symptoms, which are disruptive to the everyday life of women, have been noted in the literature. As menopause occurs within the midlife phase, symptoms of menopause are commingled with symptoms of aging. As the cohort of the "baby boom" generation has advanced in age, many studies surrounding the etiology and treatment of menopause and menopause related symptoms have been undertaken. In the recent past, the majority of studies focused on the beliefs and practices of the health care provider. In response to this, a multitude of qualitative research has been undertaken in the last decade of the twentieth century in an attempt to define this process through the experience of the woman. The research question, "What generalizations can be made form qualitative research on menopause and midlife that can promote an understanding of the processes of these phenomena and guide nurses in their interactions with women who are experiencing them?" In an effort to answer this question and to generalize findings that can be used in nursing, a meta-synthesis of 5 grounded theory studies on the process of menopause and midlife was conducted. Three of these studies focused on the menopause process and two focused on the process of menopause juxtaposed with the process of midlife. Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach was used. A total of 73 women, ranging in age from 40 to 60 were represented in the meta-synthesis. These participants were from diverse cultural backgrounds. This meta-synthesis uncovered five metaphors that were inherent in the process of menopause and aging. These metaphors included recognizing the changes ("We're not in Kansas anymore"), ambiguity surrounding the changes ("Are you a good witch or a bad witch?"), Individual perception of the events ("If I only had a brain...a heart...some courage...a way home"), integrating the changes into the lifeworld ("Can you even dye my hair to match my gown?"), with the effect of balancing the lifeworld ("You've always had the power, you just needed to find it within yourself"). The reciprocal translations described a process through which women must travel as they journey through the phenomena of midlife and menopause. This meta-synthesis supported the existence of factors that can facilitate or hinder the woman's journey. The nurse, through comprehension of the process and knowledge of the barriers and facilitators, can enter into a therapeutic co-relation with the woman and act as guide, advocate, educator, and caregiver.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Road Through Oz and the Journey Home: A Meta-Synthesisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMatarese, Coletteen_US
dc.author.detailsColette Matarese, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: colette.matarese@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163734-
dc.description.abstractAll women, barring premature death, severe pathophysiology, or surgical intervention will experience menopause. Numerous symptoms, which are disruptive to the everyday life of women, have been noted in the literature. As menopause occurs within the midlife phase, symptoms of menopause are commingled with symptoms of aging. As the cohort of the "baby boom" generation has advanced in age, many studies surrounding the etiology and treatment of menopause and menopause related symptoms have been undertaken. In the recent past, the majority of studies focused on the beliefs and practices of the health care provider. In response to this, a multitude of qualitative research has been undertaken in the last decade of the twentieth century in an attempt to define this process through the experience of the woman. The research question, "What generalizations can be made form qualitative research on menopause and midlife that can promote an understanding of the processes of these phenomena and guide nurses in their interactions with women who are experiencing them?" In an effort to answer this question and to generalize findings that can be used in nursing, a meta-synthesis of 5 grounded theory studies on the process of menopause and midlife was conducted. Three of these studies focused on the menopause process and two focused on the process of menopause juxtaposed with the process of midlife. Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach was used. A total of 73 women, ranging in age from 40 to 60 were represented in the meta-synthesis. These participants were from diverse cultural backgrounds. This meta-synthesis uncovered five metaphors that were inherent in the process of menopause and aging. These metaphors included recognizing the changes ("We're not in Kansas anymore"), ambiguity surrounding the changes ("Are you a good witch or a bad witch?"), Individual perception of the events ("If I only had a brain...a heart...some courage...a way home"), integrating the changes into the lifeworld ("Can you even dye my hair to match my gown?"), with the effect of balancing the lifeworld ("You've always had the power, you just needed to find it within yourself"). The reciprocal translations described a process through which women must travel as they journey through the phenomena of midlife and menopause. This meta-synthesis supported the existence of factors that can facilitate or hinder the woman's journey. The nurse, through comprehension of the process and knowledge of the barriers and facilitators, can enter into a therapeutic co-relation with the woman and act as guide, advocate, educator, and caregiver.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:53Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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