2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163735
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Meta-Synthesis: Mothering 'Other Than Normal' Children
Author(s):
Nelson, Antonia
Author Details:
Antonia Nelson, Ph.D., RNC, IBCLC, Associate Professor, Saint Anselm College Department of Nursing, Manchester, New Hampshire, USA, email: anelson@anselm.edu
Abstract:
Over the last few decades, smaller families, delayed childbearing and increased availability of antepartal screening technology have put an increasing responsibility on women to produce societally defined 'normal' children (Gregg, 1993; Ventura et al., 1999). At the same time shorter hospital stays, deinstitutionalization, and the movement of health services into the home setting have increased the burden of care placed on mothers of children with special needs (Palfrey et al., 1991; Steele, 1987; Thurer, 1983). A review of the literature revealed no published meta-synthesis on the mothering of children with mental or physical disabilities. This meta-synthesis addresses the need for collective knowledge development related to mothering 'other than normal' children. Noblit & Hare's (1988) comparative method of synthesizing qualitative studies was used in this meta-synthesis. This method involves the steps of getting started, deciding what is relevant to the initial interest, reading the studies, determining how the studies are related, translating the studies into one another, synthesizing translations, and expressing the synthesis. Twelve studies were included in the final synthesis for a total sample of seventy nine. The nature of the child's disability, the demographics of the study populations, and methodology used varied widely. Initially thirteen common themes were extracted from reciprocal translation of study metaphors, themes, and concepts. Secondary analysis revealed a process with four fluid steps inherent in the experience of mothering 'other than normal' children under which identified themes were categorized: Step 1 - Becoming the mother of a disabled child- Within this step two themes, 'emotions' and 'timing' helped differentiate the experience in relation to circumstances and how long women had been caregiving. Step 2 - Negotiating a new kind of mothering- The theme 'awareness of societal judgement' reveals the perception of blame mothers faced. The theme 'the learning curve' reflects the specialized knowledge required for mothering special children, and 'relationship with the healthcare system', 'maternal/child relationship', and 'family relationships' highlight the interpersonal renegotiation necessitated. Step 4 - The process of acceptance/denial -The theme of the social 'significance of normalcy' impacted the 'embrace of paradox' in which mothers both accepted their children, and hoped for a cure. Suggestions for application to practice include keeping in mind the qualities of a supportive health professional/mother relationship from the mother's perspective, remaining sensitive to the intense nature of the maternal/child bond, encouraging mothers to appreciate their children's strengths and challenge societal definitions of 'normalcy', and never under-estimating the significance of hope in fueling maternal caregiving. It is hope that keeps them going and love that sets them apart!
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Meta-Synthesis: Mothering 'Other Than Normal' Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Antoniaen_US
dc.author.detailsAntonia Nelson, Ph.D., RNC, IBCLC, Associate Professor, Saint Anselm College Department of Nursing, Manchester, New Hampshire, USA, email: anelson@anselm.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163735-
dc.description.abstractOver the last few decades, smaller families, delayed childbearing and increased availability of antepartal screening technology have put an increasing responsibility on women to produce societally defined 'normal' children (Gregg, 1993; Ventura et al., 1999). At the same time shorter hospital stays, deinstitutionalization, and the movement of health services into the home setting have increased the burden of care placed on mothers of children with special needs (Palfrey et al., 1991; Steele, 1987; Thurer, 1983). A review of the literature revealed no published meta-synthesis on the mothering of children with mental or physical disabilities. This meta-synthesis addresses the need for collective knowledge development related to mothering 'other than normal' children. Noblit & Hare's (1988) comparative method of synthesizing qualitative studies was used in this meta-synthesis. This method involves the steps of getting started, deciding what is relevant to the initial interest, reading the studies, determining how the studies are related, translating the studies into one another, synthesizing translations, and expressing the synthesis. Twelve studies were included in the final synthesis for a total sample of seventy nine. The nature of the child's disability, the demographics of the study populations, and methodology used varied widely. Initially thirteen common themes were extracted from reciprocal translation of study metaphors, themes, and concepts. Secondary analysis revealed a process with four fluid steps inherent in the experience of mothering 'other than normal' children under which identified themes were categorized: Step 1 - Becoming the mother of a disabled child- Within this step two themes, 'emotions' and 'timing' helped differentiate the experience in relation to circumstances and how long women had been caregiving. Step 2 - Negotiating a new kind of mothering- The theme 'awareness of societal judgement' reveals the perception of blame mothers faced. The theme 'the learning curve' reflects the specialized knowledge required for mothering special children, and 'relationship with the healthcare system', 'maternal/child relationship', and 'family relationships' highlight the interpersonal renegotiation necessitated. Step 4 - The process of acceptance/denial -The theme of the social 'significance of normalcy' impacted the 'embrace of paradox' in which mothers both accepted their children, and hoped for a cure. Suggestions for application to practice include keeping in mind the qualities of a supportive health professional/mother relationship from the mother's perspective, remaining sensitive to the intense nature of the maternal/child bond, encouraging mothers to appreciate their children's strengths and challenge societal definitions of 'normalcy', and never under-estimating the significance of hope in fueling maternal caregiving. It is hope that keeps them going and love that sets them apart!en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:54Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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