2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163736
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parenting Preterm Infants: A Meta-Synthesis
Author(s):
Swartz, Martha
Author Details:
Martha Swartz, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, Professor of Nursing and Primary Care Division Chair, Yale School of Nursing, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Martha.swartz@yale.edu
Abstract:
Background & Research Questions - In the U.S., the incidence of very low birth weight (VLBW; < 1500 grams) births has steadily increased due largely to technical advances in neonatal intensive care and in the management of high risk pregnancies. However, follow-up studies of preterm infants indicate higher rates of health complications and neurodevelopmental impairments in these children. The quality of mother/infant interactions may also be compromised which may lead to poorer outcomes as identified by the subsequent development of the infant. What are the unique concerns and needs of parents of preterm infants? What generalizations can be obtained from qualitative studies on parenting preterm infants that would enable nurses to provide better care and also inform larger policy issues of creating systems that would provide for optimal parent-child outcomes? Method & Sample - A meta-synthesis was conducted across eight qualitative studies in order to translate findings and place them within a larger interpretive context. The meta-ethnographic approach of Noblit & Hare was utilized. All of the studies addressed the concerns of parents of preterm infants from just prior to discharge up until the child reached the age of three. Seven studies were published in the nursing literature, one was a doctoral dissertation. The qualitative methods used were content analysis of interviews, grounded theory and interpretive phenomenology. A total of 207 parent participants were represented in the meta-synthesis. Results - The meta-synthesis yielded five reciprocal translations from 28 metaphors that were derived from the original studies. These reciprocal translations included: 1) adapting to risk - overwhelming concerns of the parents about their baby's health and development were pervasive. The notion of risk remained when the babies became toddlers as parents considered the potential physical, emotional or mental disabilities that might develop; 2) protecting fragility - parental feelings of vulnerability were closely tied with the process of providing protection; 3) preserving the family - parents and the family unit were faced with stresses which challenged their coping resources and brought about changes in role relationships. In order to cope, may parents realized that a higher level of communication between them was necessary; 4) compensating for the past - parenting styles were altered as the process of compensating the child for past experiences in the newborn intensive care unit took hold; and 5) cautiously affirming the future - as parents emerged from the initial stages of adapting to risk, protecting fragility and preserving the family, they tended to reaffirm their family unit and reconnect with extended family members and friends. Discussion - The results of this meta-synthesis illustrate the paths that parents and families of preterm infants may move through just prior to hospital discharge and on into the child's toddler years. The findings indicate the need for continued follow-up by health care providers who should provide expert clinical care that will enable the parents and family to cope with an infant at risk. Such care should be based on a sophisticated understanding of each family's unique role challenges, resources, communications systems and coping abilities. As the child develops, parenting issues of compensation, normalization, stimulation, overprotection and discipline should be considered within the larger family context. Finally, nurses should encourage each family to tell their story, so that care may be clinically grounded and informed health care decisions can be made that will further empower these young families and improve their quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParenting Preterm Infants: A Meta-Synthesisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwartz, Marthaen_US
dc.author.detailsMartha Swartz, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, Professor of Nursing and Primary Care Division Chair, Yale School of Nursing, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Martha.swartz@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163736-
dc.description.abstractBackground & Research Questions - In the U.S., the incidence of very low birth weight (VLBW; < 1500 grams) births has steadily increased due largely to technical advances in neonatal intensive care and in the management of high risk pregnancies. However, follow-up studies of preterm infants indicate higher rates of health complications and neurodevelopmental impairments in these children. The quality of mother/infant interactions may also be compromised which may lead to poorer outcomes as identified by the subsequent development of the infant. What are the unique concerns and needs of parents of preterm infants? What generalizations can be obtained from qualitative studies on parenting preterm infants that would enable nurses to provide better care and also inform larger policy issues of creating systems that would provide for optimal parent-child outcomes? Method & Sample - A meta-synthesis was conducted across eight qualitative studies in order to translate findings and place them within a larger interpretive context. The meta-ethnographic approach of Noblit & Hare was utilized. All of the studies addressed the concerns of parents of preterm infants from just prior to discharge up until the child reached the age of three. Seven studies were published in the nursing literature, one was a doctoral dissertation. The qualitative methods used were content analysis of interviews, grounded theory and interpretive phenomenology. A total of 207 parent participants were represented in the meta-synthesis. Results - The meta-synthesis yielded five reciprocal translations from 28 metaphors that were derived from the original studies. These reciprocal translations included: 1) adapting to risk - overwhelming concerns of the parents about their baby's health and development were pervasive. The notion of risk remained when the babies became toddlers as parents considered the potential physical, emotional or mental disabilities that might develop; 2) protecting fragility - parental feelings of vulnerability were closely tied with the process of providing protection; 3) preserving the family - parents and the family unit were faced with stresses which challenged their coping resources and brought about changes in role relationships. In order to cope, may parents realized that a higher level of communication between them was necessary; 4) compensating for the past - parenting styles were altered as the process of compensating the child for past experiences in the newborn intensive care unit took hold; and 5) cautiously affirming the future - as parents emerged from the initial stages of adapting to risk, protecting fragility and preserving the family, they tended to reaffirm their family unit and reconnect with extended family members and friends. Discussion - The results of this meta-synthesis illustrate the paths that parents and families of preterm infants may move through just prior to hospital discharge and on into the child's toddler years. The findings indicate the need for continued follow-up by health care providers who should provide expert clinical care that will enable the parents and family to cope with an infant at risk. Such care should be based on a sophisticated understanding of each family's unique role challenges, resources, communications systems and coping abilities. As the child develops, parenting issues of compensation, normalization, stimulation, overprotection and discipline should be considered within the larger family context. Finally, nurses should encourage each family to tell their story, so that care may be clinically grounded and informed health care decisions can be made that will further empower these young families and improve their quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:55Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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