2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163737
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Promotion and Risk Reduction for Women in Malawi, Africa
Author(s):
Gennaro, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Gennaro, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gennaro@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to test an educational intervention in which village women in Africa taught other village women health messages using techniques including dance and song. Childbearing women in Malawi, Africa face many physical, social, and mental barriers to accessing care, as there are often great physical distances between villages and health care facilities, and there are concerns for women about leaving the village. Additionally, the need for preventative health care such as postpartum care is often not widely understood. Research Question: Will a Train the Trainer educational program assist in increasing the number of women who obtain postpartum care in Malawi? Framework: Safe Motherhood guidelines informed this intervention. Method: The intervention consisted of 3 educational sessions for village women (chosen by the Group Village Headman (GVH)) in which they learned teaching techniques and content on health promotion and risk reduction for childbearing women. Over 70 women were trained, and each woman kept logs of how many people she taught after the training sessions were complete. To test the effectiveness of the intervention a pre and post intervention survey was designed and distributed in the study area. Fifteen villages were chosen randomly from all of the villages in Chimutu district. The GVH from each of the five sections of the Traditional Authority Chimutu was consulted and a list of all villages in that area was compiled. Random selection of a village in each GVH was then made. Once one village was randomly selected a map was used to determine how many other villages were close enough to the initial village to allow for data collection during that same visit. This technique was replicated until the 15 villages were selected from the original village in the cluster. Data were obtained from 189 villagers for the preintervention survey and 170 villagers for the post intervention survey. The survey was designed by a group of researchers in Malawi and the United States and was based on the curriculum for the intervention program, was translated into Chichewa and back translated into English. A group of church women and village women examined the survey for content validity. Results: More than 97% of both samples felt that women needed to try to access care immediately when labor began or even before labor began, but the average length of time respondents reported that it took to walk to receive care was one hour and fifty minutes. Although respondents understood the need for prenatal and intrapartum care in the preintervention survey group, only 62.4% of the sample felt that receiving postpartum care was important. When asked if they actually received postpartum care in their last pregnancy, however, only 26% said yes. In the post intervention survey significantly more subjects reported obtaining postpartum care (72%). Implications: The Train the Trainer intervention seems to be a promising way to provide information that can have an impact on women's health practices in an international setting where health care practices and knowledge are not optimal.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Promotion and Risk Reduction for Women in Malawi, Africaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGennaro, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Gennaro, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gennaro@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163737-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to test an educational intervention in which village women in Africa taught other village women health messages using techniques including dance and song. Childbearing women in Malawi, Africa face many physical, social, and mental barriers to accessing care, as there are often great physical distances between villages and health care facilities, and there are concerns for women about leaving the village. Additionally, the need for preventative health care such as postpartum care is often not widely understood. Research Question: Will a Train the Trainer educational program assist in increasing the number of women who obtain postpartum care in Malawi? Framework: Safe Motherhood guidelines informed this intervention. Method: The intervention consisted of 3 educational sessions for village women (chosen by the Group Village Headman (GVH)) in which they learned teaching techniques and content on health promotion and risk reduction for childbearing women. Over 70 women were trained, and each woman kept logs of how many people she taught after the training sessions were complete. To test the effectiveness of the intervention a pre and post intervention survey was designed and distributed in the study area. Fifteen villages were chosen randomly from all of the villages in Chimutu district. The GVH from each of the five sections of the Traditional Authority Chimutu was consulted and a list of all villages in that area was compiled. Random selection of a village in each GVH was then made. Once one village was randomly selected a map was used to determine how many other villages were close enough to the initial village to allow for data collection during that same visit. This technique was replicated until the 15 villages were selected from the original village in the cluster. Data were obtained from 189 villagers for the preintervention survey and 170 villagers for the post intervention survey. The survey was designed by a group of researchers in Malawi and the United States and was based on the curriculum for the intervention program, was translated into Chichewa and back translated into English. A group of church women and village women examined the survey for content validity. Results: More than 97% of both samples felt that women needed to try to access care immediately when labor began or even before labor began, but the average length of time respondents reported that it took to walk to receive care was one hour and fifty minutes. Although respondents understood the need for prenatal and intrapartum care in the preintervention survey group, only 62.4% of the sample felt that receiving postpartum care was important. When asked if they actually received postpartum care in their last pregnancy, however, only 26% said yes. In the post intervention survey significantly more subjects reported obtaining postpartum care (72%). Implications: The Train the Trainer intervention seems to be a promising way to provide information that can have an impact on women's health practices in an international setting where health care practices and knowledge are not optimal.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:56Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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