I Can See Clearly Now: Self-Knowledge and Identity Shifts as Turning Points in Women's Health Behavior Change

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163738
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
I Can See Clearly Now: Self-Knowledge and Identity Shifts as Turning Points in Women's Health Behavior Change
Author(s):
Kearney, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret Kearney, PhD, Boston College, School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: margaret.kearney.1@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this grounded formal theory analysis was to synthesize qualitative studies of women's health behavior change to elucidate important shared pathways and turning points. According to the World Health Organization, chronic illness fostered by unhealthy behavior will soon have a greater impact than infectious disease in reducing human lifespan. Nurses play a pivotal role in assisting clients to change their lifestyles to reduce health risks. Theorists of health behavior have used quantitative indicators of predictors and progression in behavior change, whereas qualitative research offers an insider's view of the experience in context. An inductive understanding of the process of successful change can enhance existing models and guide nurses in facilitating women's health behavior. Research question: What are the shared pathways and main turning points across grounded theory studies of women's smoking cessation, alcohol and drug abuse recovery, and dietary behavior change? Framework: Symbolic interactionism, in which humans are proposed to act in response to evolving personal definitions of their situation created from symbolic meanings in their social environments, provided the theoretical underpinning for this analysis. Methods: The grounded formal theory approach is one of several approaches to qualitative meta-analysis, in which context and outcomes of qualitative studies of similar phenomena are synthesized systematically to produce new findings arising from all contributing studies. The sample for this analysis consisted of 20 published and unpublished grounded theory studies of women's experiences of struggling with and achieving health behavior change, including alcohol and drug abuse recovery, smoking cessation, eating disorder management, and weight control. Using theoretical sampling of the study materials and constant comparative techniques documented by memos and diagrams, the settings, researchers, samples, approaches, findings of the studies were analyzed. A common pathway with important variations was constructed and validated using criteria for soundness of grounded theory developed by the method's originators. Results: Women who successfully made major lifestyle changes experienced a lasting identity shift, which was the result of an emotionally difficult process of honest self-appraisal to which outsiders such as health professionals sometimes contributed. These shifts had both negative elements (such as accepting oneself as an addict) and positive ones (such as realizing one's capacity to change social triggers to over-eating), and in all cases were a consequence of increased honesty and clarity of self-knowledge. Only after this shift could pervasive lifestyle change be sustained. Implications: This model contributes useful enhancement to existing theories. Nurses can use these findings to frame sensitive and productive questions in assessing and counseling women with unhealthy behaviors, and to facilitate their movement toward lasting change.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleI Can See Clearly Now: Self-Knowledge and Identity Shifts as Turning Points in Women's Health Behavior Changeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Kearney, PhD, Boston College, School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: margaret.kearney.1@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163738-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this grounded formal theory analysis was to synthesize qualitative studies of women's health behavior change to elucidate important shared pathways and turning points. According to the World Health Organization, chronic illness fostered by unhealthy behavior will soon have a greater impact than infectious disease in reducing human lifespan. Nurses play a pivotal role in assisting clients to change their lifestyles to reduce health risks. Theorists of health behavior have used quantitative indicators of predictors and progression in behavior change, whereas qualitative research offers an insider's view of the experience in context. An inductive understanding of the process of successful change can enhance existing models and guide nurses in facilitating women's health behavior. Research question: What are the shared pathways and main turning points across grounded theory studies of women's smoking cessation, alcohol and drug abuse recovery, and dietary behavior change? Framework: Symbolic interactionism, in which humans are proposed to act in response to evolving personal definitions of their situation created from symbolic meanings in their social environments, provided the theoretical underpinning for this analysis. Methods: The grounded formal theory approach is one of several approaches to qualitative meta-analysis, in which context and outcomes of qualitative studies of similar phenomena are synthesized systematically to produce new findings arising from all contributing studies. The sample for this analysis consisted of 20 published and unpublished grounded theory studies of women's experiences of struggling with and achieving health behavior change, including alcohol and drug abuse recovery, smoking cessation, eating disorder management, and weight control. Using theoretical sampling of the study materials and constant comparative techniques documented by memos and diagrams, the settings, researchers, samples, approaches, findings of the studies were analyzed. A common pathway with important variations was constructed and validated using criteria for soundness of grounded theory developed by the method's originators. Results: Women who successfully made major lifestyle changes experienced a lasting identity shift, which was the result of an emotionally difficult process of honest self-appraisal to which outsiders such as health professionals sometimes contributed. These shifts had both negative elements (such as accepting oneself as an addict) and positive ones (such as realizing one's capacity to change social triggers to over-eating), and in all cases were a consequence of increased honesty and clarity of self-knowledge. Only after this shift could pervasive lifestyle change be sustained. Implications: This model contributes useful enhancement to existing theories. Nurses can use these findings to frame sensitive and productive questions in assessing and counseling women with unhealthy behaviors, and to facilitate their movement toward lasting change.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:57Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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