2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163739
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating for Behavioral Change Through Nurse Telephone Intervention
Author(s):
Moore, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Moore, PhD, Research Instructor, Wake Forest University, School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: mmoore@wfubmc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: A primary goal of 21st century nurses is the provision of care that is both effective and cost effective. This paper describes documented behavioral change in three nursing intervention studies and/or programs that have utilized nurse telephone calls as the sole contact between nurses and pregnant women or parents of young children. The intervention in each program is primarily educational. Research Question: Will a nursing telephone intervention be effective in helping women to change harmful behaviors and thus improve health? Framework: Orem's Supportive-Educative System provided the framework for these studies. Methods: In the first two interventions, the aim was to reduce cigarette smoking among women, for it is strongly related to preterm and low birthweight (LBW) birth. Using nurse telephone intervention as part of a study to reduce preterm and LBW birth in low-income women (NRO2401-1) nurses telephoned women twice each week and encouraged them to stop smoking. Women in the first intervention (n=130) were receiving care at a public clinic, and were low income women (78 African American, 52 White). Women in the second intervention (n=1005) were part of an HMO. In the third intervention ("Parent Line"), nurses fluent in Spanish telephoned low income, newly arrived immigrant parents from Mexico (n=262) who were known to have low rates of well child health care and immunizations for their children (ages birth to five). The nurses focused on advice for age related health and developmental issues. Results: In the first intervention we achieved 35% smoking cessation rate (a total 65% reduction/cessation) in African-American women, and a 19% smoking cessation rate (a total 56% reduction/cessation) in Caucasian women, for an overall change of 61.5%. In the second intervention with women enrolled in an HMO, we achieved a 45% smoking cessation rate and a total 70% reduction/cessation rate. Intervention three involved a sample of 262 families receiving Parent Line services from July 1, 1999 to June 30, 2000. In this group, 97% kept scheduled well child visits, 98% had received scheduled immunizations on time, and 90% of breastfeeding mothers continued breastfeeding through the first three moths. Other behavior changes were related to parenting behaviors (e.g. methods of discipline), nutrition (e.g. weaning, appropriate foods for toddlers,) and illness (e.g. when to seek are from a health care provider). Conclusions: The telephone interventions were effective in changing behavior. Implications: The power of nurses to help women change behavior is not dependent on a face to face interaction. Telephone interventions by caring and knowledgeable nurses can be an effective method for changing health behaviors such as smoking and obtaining well child health care and immunizations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducating for Behavioral Change Through Nurse Telephone Interventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Moore, PhD, Research Instructor, Wake Forest University, School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: mmoore@wfubmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163739-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: A primary goal of 21st century nurses is the provision of care that is both effective and cost effective. This paper describes documented behavioral change in three nursing intervention studies and/or programs that have utilized nurse telephone calls as the sole contact between nurses and pregnant women or parents of young children. The intervention in each program is primarily educational. Research Question: Will a nursing telephone intervention be effective in helping women to change harmful behaviors and thus improve health? Framework: Orem's Supportive-Educative System provided the framework for these studies. Methods: In the first two interventions, the aim was to reduce cigarette smoking among women, for it is strongly related to preterm and low birthweight (LBW) birth. Using nurse telephone intervention as part of a study to reduce preterm and LBW birth in low-income women (NRO2401-1) nurses telephoned women twice each week and encouraged them to stop smoking. Women in the first intervention (n=130) were receiving care at a public clinic, and were low income women (78 African American, 52 White). Women in the second intervention (n=1005) were part of an HMO. In the third intervention ("Parent Line"), nurses fluent in Spanish telephoned low income, newly arrived immigrant parents from Mexico (n=262) who were known to have low rates of well child health care and immunizations for their children (ages birth to five). The nurses focused on advice for age related health and developmental issues. Results: In the first intervention we achieved 35% smoking cessation rate (a total 65% reduction/cessation) in African-American women, and a 19% smoking cessation rate (a total 56% reduction/cessation) in Caucasian women, for an overall change of 61.5%. In the second intervention with women enrolled in an HMO, we achieved a 45% smoking cessation rate and a total 70% reduction/cessation rate. Intervention three involved a sample of 262 families receiving Parent Line services from July 1, 1999 to June 30, 2000. In this group, 97% kept scheduled well child visits, 98% had received scheduled immunizations on time, and 90% of breastfeeding mothers continued breastfeeding through the first three moths. Other behavior changes were related to parenting behaviors (e.g. methods of discipline), nutrition (e.g. weaning, appropriate foods for toddlers,) and illness (e.g. when to seek are from a health care provider). Conclusions: The telephone interventions were effective in changing behavior. Implications: The power of nurses to help women change behavior is not dependent on a face to face interaction. Telephone interventions by caring and knowledgeable nurses can be an effective method for changing health behaviors such as smoking and obtaining well child health care and immunizations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:58Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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