2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163740
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Women Prisoners' Risky Sexual Behaviors and Protective Practices
Author(s):
Fogel, Catherine
Author Details:
Catherine Fogel, PhD, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: cfogel@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To acquire needed information about the risky sexual behaviors of incarcerated women and to learn what, if anything, they do to protect their health. This study served as the listening phase for the development of an HIV intervention aimed specifically for these women. Framework: Interventions based on an empowerment philosophy which emphasizes working with women's strengths and experiences to enable them to find workable HIV prevention behaviors are critical to ensuring that women have strategies they can use to successfully avoid STDs and HIV infection. More than 79,000 women are currently in prisons. STDs and HIV are common in women prisoners causing illness, misery, and often death, but few effective programs have been developed to assist women prisoners decrease their risks and increase behaviors that may protect them. Within the empowerment model, the educational process begins with a phase of systematic listening to learn about the issues which deeply concern the people in question. Method: Data were collected through extensive interviews with 25 incarcerated women. Questions included "Tell me about the drugs you use?", "How do you decide who to have sex with?" and "What do you do/use to protect yourself?" One-half of the respondents were white and the other half African-American; they ranged in age from 19 to 45. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed; field notes were made after each interview. Transcripts and audiotapes were reviewed for key ideas, words, phrases, and actual quotes and common themes identified. Results: While all women identified "catching AIDS" as a risk of sexual activity and mentioned their fear of the disease, few were concerned about contracting other STDs. The decision to protect one's self was contextual and situation-specific. Women rarely used condoms with their primary partner because of their emotional commitment to him. At the same time, almost all the women found it difficult to trust their partners. Women who had casual partners or women who were sex workers often made decisions about use of condoms based on a partner's appearance, marital status, hygiene, money, age, or lifestyle. All women mentioned drug use and trading sex for drugs as their reasons for not protecting themselves. When asked how women could protect themselves, all agreed condoms were the best or only way. Reasons for using condoms included not knowing the man, having a first time partner, knowing the man had other partners, and having had a previous STD. Pregnancy was a reason for both using and not using condoms. Women gave detailed histories of drug abuse and risky sexual encounters associated with drugs. Few women said violence against them prevented them from using protective sexual practices despite being raped, abused, experiencing rough sex, and being threatened if they refused to have sexual intercourse. Implications: Using this information, recommendations for designing interventions to reduce STD/HIV risk interventions for pre-release incarcerated women will be offered.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Women Prisoners' Risky Sexual Behaviors and Protective Practicesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFogel, Catherineen_US
dc.author.detailsCatherine Fogel, PhD, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: cfogel@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163740-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To acquire needed information about the risky sexual behaviors of incarcerated women and to learn what, if anything, they do to protect their health. This study served as the listening phase for the development of an HIV intervention aimed specifically for these women. Framework: Interventions based on an empowerment philosophy which emphasizes working with women's strengths and experiences to enable them to find workable HIV prevention behaviors are critical to ensuring that women have strategies they can use to successfully avoid STDs and HIV infection. More than 79,000 women are currently in prisons. STDs and HIV are common in women prisoners causing illness, misery, and often death, but few effective programs have been developed to assist women prisoners decrease their risks and increase behaviors that may protect them. Within the empowerment model, the educational process begins with a phase of systematic listening to learn about the issues which deeply concern the people in question. Method: Data were collected through extensive interviews with 25 incarcerated women. Questions included "Tell me about the drugs you use?", "How do you decide who to have sex with?" and "What do you do/use to protect yourself?" One-half of the respondents were white and the other half African-American; they ranged in age from 19 to 45. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed; field notes were made after each interview. Transcripts and audiotapes were reviewed for key ideas, words, phrases, and actual quotes and common themes identified. Results: While all women identified "catching AIDS" as a risk of sexual activity and mentioned their fear of the disease, few were concerned about contracting other STDs. The decision to protect one's self was contextual and situation-specific. Women rarely used condoms with their primary partner because of their emotional commitment to him. At the same time, almost all the women found it difficult to trust their partners. Women who had casual partners or women who were sex workers often made decisions about use of condoms based on a partner's appearance, marital status, hygiene, money, age, or lifestyle. All women mentioned drug use and trading sex for drugs as their reasons for not protecting themselves. When asked how women could protect themselves, all agreed condoms were the best or only way. Reasons for using condoms included not knowing the man, having a first time partner, knowing the man had other partners, and having had a previous STD. Pregnancy was a reason for both using and not using condoms. Women gave detailed histories of drug abuse and risky sexual encounters associated with drugs. Few women said violence against them prevented them from using protective sexual practices despite being raped, abused, experiencing rough sex, and being threatened if they refused to have sexual intercourse. Implications: Using this information, recommendations for designing interventions to reduce STD/HIV risk interventions for pre-release incarcerated women will be offered.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:59Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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