Effect of Alcohol Intoxication on Cerebral Blood Flow and Outcomes Following a Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163743
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Alcohol Intoxication on Cerebral Blood Flow and Outcomes Following a Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Author(s):
Alexander, Sheila
Author Details:
Sheila Alexander, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email; salexand@pitt.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between alcohol level at the time of hospital admission and cerebral blood flow and outcomes in the adult traumatic brain injured population. Research Questions: We hypothesized that individuals with ethanol levels (ETOH) > 100 mg/dl. will have decreased cerebral blood flow on admission and poorer outcomes than individuals with ETOH < 100mg/dl. Framework: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs to young adults or to the elderly over 75 years of age with the risk of injury to males being twice that of females. Alcohol is known to play a significant role in the occurrence of TBI. Cerebral blood flow reductions that typically occur immediately after TBI are thought to be less severe when ethanol is present, thus providing a degree of neuroprotection. Alternatively, clinical research suggests that alcohol intoxication complicates treatment after TBI and has a negative effect on outcomes. Methods: Seventy-four individuals age 16-75, admitted with a diagnosis of TBI with a Glasgow Coma Score ?8 without evidence of hypoxia, hypotension, or seizures prior to hospital admission were entered into the study. ETOH levels were obtained in the Emergency Department on patients who were believed to be drinking prior to the time of injury. GCS measures were collected prospectively from emergency room and transport records. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were derived from the xenon CT CBF conducted within 36 hours of admission and analyzed utilizing the XeCT-NT software program by Diversified Diagnostic Products (Houston, Texas). Admission alcohol levels were correlated with hemispheric and global CBF levels and outcomes at 3 months post injury. Results and conclusions : The mean ETOH level was 51.46 (SD=84.59 ). There was not a significant difference in cerebral blood flows between subjects with and without ETOH testing conducted. There was no significant correlation between global CBF and ETOH level. There was a significant association between ETOH and outcomes with higher levels of alcohol correlated with poorer outcomes. This study demonstrates that high ETOH consumption does not significantly impact global cerebral blood flow immediately after the injury. It also suggests that elevated ETOH levels at time of injury negatively impacts outcomes at 3 months. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development: Knowledge of the effects of admission ETOH level on CBF influences bedside care to the acutely ill TBI patient. Additionally, awareness of the impact of ETOH level on outcomes allows tailored care to help negate these effects and improve outcomes for this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Alcohol Intoxication on Cerebral Blood Flow and Outcomes Following a Severe Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsSheila Alexander, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email; salexand@pitt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163743-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between alcohol level at the time of hospital admission and cerebral blood flow and outcomes in the adult traumatic brain injured population. Research Questions: We hypothesized that individuals with ethanol levels (ETOH) > 100 mg/dl. will have decreased cerebral blood flow on admission and poorer outcomes than individuals with ETOH < 100mg/dl. Framework: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs to young adults or to the elderly over 75 years of age with the risk of injury to males being twice that of females. Alcohol is known to play a significant role in the occurrence of TBI. Cerebral blood flow reductions that typically occur immediately after TBI are thought to be less severe when ethanol is present, thus providing a degree of neuroprotection. Alternatively, clinical research suggests that alcohol intoxication complicates treatment after TBI and has a negative effect on outcomes. Methods: Seventy-four individuals age 16-75, admitted with a diagnosis of TBI with a Glasgow Coma Score ?8 without evidence of hypoxia, hypotension, or seizures prior to hospital admission were entered into the study. ETOH levels were obtained in the Emergency Department on patients who were believed to be drinking prior to the time of injury. GCS measures were collected prospectively from emergency room and transport records. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were derived from the xenon CT CBF conducted within 36 hours of admission and analyzed utilizing the XeCT-NT software program by Diversified Diagnostic Products (Houston, Texas). Admission alcohol levels were correlated with hemispheric and global CBF levels and outcomes at 3 months post injury. Results and conclusions : The mean ETOH level was 51.46 (SD=84.59 ). There was not a significant difference in cerebral blood flows between subjects with and without ETOH testing conducted. There was no significant correlation between global CBF and ETOH level. There was a significant association between ETOH and outcomes with higher levels of alcohol correlated with poorer outcomes. This study demonstrates that high ETOH consumption does not significantly impact global cerebral blood flow immediately after the injury. It also suggests that elevated ETOH levels at time of injury negatively impacts outcomes at 3 months. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development: Knowledge of the effects of admission ETOH level on CBF influences bedside care to the acutely ill TBI patient. Additionally, awareness of the impact of ETOH level on outcomes allows tailored care to help negate these effects and improve outcomes for this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:02Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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