Anxiety, Uncertainty & Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress in Parents of Children Recently Diagnosed with Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163745
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anxiety, Uncertainty & Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress in Parents of Children Recently Diagnosed with Cancer
Author(s):
Santacroce, Sheila
Author Details:
Sheila Santacroce, PhD, Assistant Professor, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.santacroce@yale.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Investigators have identified high levels of anxiety, uncertainty and symptoms of post-traumatic stress in parents of survivors of childhood cancer. However, the level of these parental responses early in the course of the child's illness and treatment is not known. Purpose of this study was to describe the levels of uncertainty, anxiety and symptoms of post-traumatic stress experienced by parents of children newly diagnosed with cancer. FRAMEWORK: The study was guided by Mishel's (1988) Uncertainty in Illness Theory. METHODS: The study setting was the Division of Oncology at a children's hospital located in a mid-Atlantic U.S. city. Participants were 11 parents of children diagnosed with cancer within the past four to six weeks; 8 of the parents were mothers and 3 were fathers. Parental anxiety was measured by State-Trait Anxiety Scale (Spielberger, 1983). Parental uncertainty was measured by the Parent Perception of Uncertainty Scale (Mishel, 1983). Parental symptoms of post-traumatic stress were measured by the Reaction Index (Pynoos et al., 1993). RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: In the study sample, the mean total score for parental uncertainty was 82, while the mean total score in a cross-sectional sample of parents of children with leukemia was reported as 70 (Mishel, 1997). In the study sample, the mean total for parental anxiety was 53.4, while the mean total score for a sample of neuropsychiatric patients with anxiety reaction was reported as 49.0 (Spielberger, 1983). The mean total score for symptoms of post-traumatic stress in the study sample was 44.9, with 9 of the scores falling in the severe stress range (Pynoos et al., 1993). The relatively high levels of parental anxiety, uncertainty, and emotional distress in the study sample indicate that early in the course of the illness parents of children with cancer need supportive care interventions to relieve anxiety, uncertainty and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: Nurses should familiarize themselves with sources of parental anxiety, uncertainty and stress that exist early in the course of cancer in a child, and work to develop and test interventions that can help parents manage these responses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnxiety, Uncertainty & Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress in Parents of Children Recently Diagnosed with Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSantacroce, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsSheila Santacroce, PhD, Assistant Professor, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.santacroce@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163745-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Investigators have identified high levels of anxiety, uncertainty and symptoms of post-traumatic stress in parents of survivors of childhood cancer. However, the level of these parental responses early in the course of the child's illness and treatment is not known. Purpose of this study was to describe the levels of uncertainty, anxiety and symptoms of post-traumatic stress experienced by parents of children newly diagnosed with cancer. FRAMEWORK: The study was guided by Mishel's (1988) Uncertainty in Illness Theory. METHODS: The study setting was the Division of Oncology at a children's hospital located in a mid-Atlantic U.S. city. Participants were 11 parents of children diagnosed with cancer within the past four to six weeks; 8 of the parents were mothers and 3 were fathers. Parental anxiety was measured by State-Trait Anxiety Scale (Spielberger, 1983). Parental uncertainty was measured by the Parent Perception of Uncertainty Scale (Mishel, 1983). Parental symptoms of post-traumatic stress were measured by the Reaction Index (Pynoos et al., 1993). RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: In the study sample, the mean total score for parental uncertainty was 82, while the mean total score in a cross-sectional sample of parents of children with leukemia was reported as 70 (Mishel, 1997). In the study sample, the mean total for parental anxiety was 53.4, while the mean total score for a sample of neuropsychiatric patients with anxiety reaction was reported as 49.0 (Spielberger, 1983). The mean total score for symptoms of post-traumatic stress in the study sample was 44.9, with 9 of the scores falling in the severe stress range (Pynoos et al., 1993). The relatively high levels of parental anxiety, uncertainty, and emotional distress in the study sample indicate that early in the course of the illness parents of children with cancer need supportive care interventions to relieve anxiety, uncertainty and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: Nurses should familiarize themselves with sources of parental anxiety, uncertainty and stress that exist early in the course of cancer in a child, and work to develop and test interventions that can help parents manage these responses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:04Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.