Children with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making Regarding Phase I Clinical Trials

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163746
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making Regarding Phase I Clinical Trials
Author(s):
Deatrick, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Deatrick, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: deatrick@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To describe how families manage the decision for their children to be involved in phase I clinical trials for treatment of cancer. FRAMEWORK: Knafl & Deatrick's Family Management Styles Framework was used as an organizing framework for the analysis. METHODS: Data from 2 descriptive studies regarding decision making in pediatric oncology were analyzed using secondary analysis techniques (Deatrick & Ledlie, 1999; Hinds, Vogel, Clarke-Steffen, 1997b; Santacroce, Deatrick, & Ledlie, 2000) in order to describe how families manage the decision for their children to be involved in phase I clinical trials. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: While the perspectives of individual family members have been ascertained, empirical studies of family decision making regarding research are largely limited to those currently being conducted by Broome (2/1/98-1/31/01) and Nelson (7/6/99-6/30/04), and those recently conducted by Hinds, et al. (1998a & 1998b). While the purposes of those studies conducted by Hinds were to characterize the processes involved in end-of-life decision making, they also provided rich data about participation in phase I clinical trials. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: The National Institutes of Health and the Federal Drug Administration now require children to be included in all human subjects research conducted or funded by the NIH unless scientific or ethical reasons preclude them from being included. Participation of children in research, however, raises complex social, psychological, physical, ethical, and regulatory concerns for them and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making Regarding Phase I Clinical Trialsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeatrick, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Deatrick, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: deatrick@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163746-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To describe how families manage the decision for their children to be involved in phase I clinical trials for treatment of cancer. FRAMEWORK: Knafl & Deatrick's Family Management Styles Framework was used as an organizing framework for the analysis. METHODS: Data from 2 descriptive studies regarding decision making in pediatric oncology were analyzed using secondary analysis techniques (Deatrick & Ledlie, 1999; Hinds, Vogel, Clarke-Steffen, 1997b; Santacroce, Deatrick, & Ledlie, 2000) in order to describe how families manage the decision for their children to be involved in phase I clinical trials. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: While the perspectives of individual family members have been ascertained, empirical studies of family decision making regarding research are largely limited to those currently being conducted by Broome (2/1/98-1/31/01) and Nelson (7/6/99-6/30/04), and those recently conducted by Hinds, et al. (1998a & 1998b). While the purposes of those studies conducted by Hinds were to characterize the processes involved in end-of-life decision making, they also provided rich data about participation in phase I clinical trials. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: The National Institutes of Health and the Federal Drug Administration now require children to be included in all human subjects research conducted or funded by the NIH unless scientific or ethical reasons preclude them from being included. Participation of children in research, however, raises complex social, psychological, physical, ethical, and regulatory concerns for them and their families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:06Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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