2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163747
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer
Author(s):
Hobbie, Wendy
Author Details:
Wendy Hobbie, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hobbie2@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: This study assessed the prevalence of posttraumatic stress symptoms in young adult survivors of childhood cancer, and the association of posttraumatic stress with anxiety, adjustment, perceptions of illness and treatment, and medical data extracted from oncology records. FRAMEWORK: Anxiety and psychological stress theory provided the conceptual basis for this study. METHODS: Seventy-eight young adults (ages 18-40) who had been treated for childhood cancer completed questionnaires and psychiatric interviews assessing posttraumatic stress, anxiety, perceptions of their illness and treatment, and symptoms of psychological distress. Data on treatment intensity and severity of medical late effects were collected via chart review. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: 20.5% of the sample met the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD at some point since the end of their treatment. Clinically significant levels of intrusive (9%) and avoidant (16.7%) symptoms were reported. Participants also reported elevated state and trait anxiety. Participants with PTSD reported higher perceived current life threat, more intense treatment histories, and higher (and clinically significant) levels of psychological distress than those who did not have PTSD. Survivors' perceptions of treatment and its effects were more highly associated with posttraumatic stress than were more objective medical data. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: One-fifth of this sample of young adult survivors of childhood cancer met criteria for diagnosis of PTSD, with clinically significant symptoms of intrusion and avoidance reported. As in other samples, PTSD in young adult survivors was associated with anxiety and other psychological distress. The data suggest that cancer-related posttraumatic stress may emerge in young adulthood and may affect the achievement of developmental milestones and orientation toward health care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptoms of Posttraumatic Stress in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHobbie, Wendyen_US
dc.author.detailsWendy Hobbie, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hobbie2@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163747-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: This study assessed the prevalence of posttraumatic stress symptoms in young adult survivors of childhood cancer, and the association of posttraumatic stress with anxiety, adjustment, perceptions of illness and treatment, and medical data extracted from oncology records. FRAMEWORK: Anxiety and psychological stress theory provided the conceptual basis for this study. METHODS: Seventy-eight young adults (ages 18-40) who had been treated for childhood cancer completed questionnaires and psychiatric interviews assessing posttraumatic stress, anxiety, perceptions of their illness and treatment, and symptoms of psychological distress. Data on treatment intensity and severity of medical late effects were collected via chart review. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: 20.5% of the sample met the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD at some point since the end of their treatment. Clinically significant levels of intrusive (9%) and avoidant (16.7%) symptoms were reported. Participants also reported elevated state and trait anxiety. Participants with PTSD reported higher perceived current life threat, more intense treatment histories, and higher (and clinically significant) levels of psychological distress than those who did not have PTSD. Survivors' perceptions of treatment and its effects were more highly associated with posttraumatic stress than were more objective medical data. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: One-fifth of this sample of young adult survivors of childhood cancer met criteria for diagnosis of PTSD, with clinically significant symptoms of intrusion and avoidance reported. As in other samples, PTSD in young adult survivors was associated with anxiety and other psychological distress. The data suggest that cancer-related posttraumatic stress may emerge in young adulthood and may affect the achievement of developmental milestones and orientation toward health care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:07Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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