Voices From the Margin: The Certified Nurse's Aide Role in the Pain Management of Institutionalized Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163749
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Voices From the Margin: The Certified Nurse's Aide Role in the Pain Management of Institutionalized Elders
Author(s):
Varholak, Dorothy
Author Details:
Dorothy Varholak, EdD, Assistant Professor, University of Hartford, College of Nursing, West Hartford, Connecticut, USA, email: varholak@mail.hartford.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to discover dominant processes and themes of the CNA role regarding pain management of elder residents in an extended care facility. The objectives were to explore the personal thoughts, feelings, attitudes, interpretive capabilities and concerns of Certified Nurses Aides regarding their role in pain management and issues of the pain experience among their elderly patients. A qualitative study design utilizing focus group discussion technique was used to obtain reality based, lived experience data from a convenience group of Nurse's Aides. The study sample consisted of twenty-two volunteer nurse's aides employed at a large, multi-level extended care facility in Connecticut. These were divided into five small groups of four to eight members. The median age was forty-six, and the average length of experience was thirteen years. All participants were currently certified in Connecticut. Six general questions were asked of the participants: How do you know when patients have pain? What tells you when they are not in pain? What do you do when you recognize your patient is in pain? What are some of the things you do to ease pain? What do you do to make pain worse? What do you need to know to provide the best care for patients in pain? Quantitative demographic information was requested of each participant to assess naturally occurring randomization. This included age, length and type of service and training program. Four CNA participant co-facilitators were trained to conduct subsequent groups. This assisted subject comfort during discussions, reduced researcher interaction with subjects and allowed observation of the receptivity of participants to training in an advanced concept. Subjects were encouraged to voice opinions, thoughts and feelings openly while responses were tape-recorded. To ensure anonymity, a non-contact secretary converted tapes into typed transcripts for researcher review and interactive researchers were not involved with subjects in any daily work capacity. Study results revealed a pro-active, patient advocate worker group. They possessed excellent pain reporting and pain identification skills. Both accuracy and immediacy did not appear diminished, even when patients were severely demented or largely non-verbal. In addition, aide observations precisely followed American Pain Society and US Healthcare clinician guidelines in content and scope. This was considered important since diminished pain self-reports in confused patients represents a source of deficit pain management in elderly populations. CNA co-facilitators learned facilitation techniques with one instruction and were highly successful functioning in this capacity throughout the conduct of the study. The desire of this group to be recognized as a meaningful voice in the healthcare delivery system at their facility was significant, strong and clear. Implications of the study supported further role development studies with this staff in interdisciplinary approaches to developing pain management programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVoices From the Margin: The Certified Nurse's Aide Role in the Pain Management of Institutionalized Eldersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVarholak, Dorothyen_US
dc.author.detailsDorothy Varholak, EdD, Assistant Professor, University of Hartford, College of Nursing, West Hartford, Connecticut, USA, email: varholak@mail.hartford.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163749-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to discover dominant processes and themes of the CNA role regarding pain management of elder residents in an extended care facility. The objectives were to explore the personal thoughts, feelings, attitudes, interpretive capabilities and concerns of Certified Nurses Aides regarding their role in pain management and issues of the pain experience among their elderly patients. A qualitative study design utilizing focus group discussion technique was used to obtain reality based, lived experience data from a convenience group of Nurse's Aides. The study sample consisted of twenty-two volunteer nurse's aides employed at a large, multi-level extended care facility in Connecticut. These were divided into five small groups of four to eight members. The median age was forty-six, and the average length of experience was thirteen years. All participants were currently certified in Connecticut. Six general questions were asked of the participants: How do you know when patients have pain? What tells you when they are not in pain? What do you do when you recognize your patient is in pain? What are some of the things you do to ease pain? What do you do to make pain worse? What do you need to know to provide the best care for patients in pain? Quantitative demographic information was requested of each participant to assess naturally occurring randomization. This included age, length and type of service and training program. Four CNA participant co-facilitators were trained to conduct subsequent groups. This assisted subject comfort during discussions, reduced researcher interaction with subjects and allowed observation of the receptivity of participants to training in an advanced concept. Subjects were encouraged to voice opinions, thoughts and feelings openly while responses were tape-recorded. To ensure anonymity, a non-contact secretary converted tapes into typed transcripts for researcher review and interactive researchers were not involved with subjects in any daily work capacity. Study results revealed a pro-active, patient advocate worker group. They possessed excellent pain reporting and pain identification skills. Both accuracy and immediacy did not appear diminished, even when patients were severely demented or largely non-verbal. In addition, aide observations precisely followed American Pain Society and US Healthcare clinician guidelines in content and scope. This was considered important since diminished pain self-reports in confused patients represents a source of deficit pain management in elderly populations. CNA co-facilitators learned facilitation techniques with one instruction and were highly successful functioning in this capacity throughout the conduct of the study. The desire of this group to be recognized as a meaningful voice in the healthcare delivery system at their facility was significant, strong and clear. Implications of the study supported further role development studies with this staff in interdisciplinary approaches to developing pain management programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:09Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.