2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163751
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Aged Patients' Perceptions of Outcomes After Critical Illness
Author(s):
Mick, Diane
Author Details:
Diane Mick, PhD, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: diane_mick@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Translating statistical findings into human experience via examination of aged patients' written anecdotal perceptions of post-illness functional status is a valuable means for understanding the process of recovery from critical illness. Specific Aims: To enhance understanding of aged patients' ICU recovery experience. Framework: Grounded in ethics of age-based rationing of intensive care. Methods: Narrative analysis, as part of a larger prospective cohort study of patients (N = 104) (ages 65-95) from three ICUs at a northeastern academic medical center, was carried out on subjects' voluntary written personal observations and reflections from 1-month and 3-month follow-up questionnaires. Results and Conclusions: Evidence of the statistical predictive relationships, as found in the primary study, was discovered within the inherent continuity in 1-month and 3-month anecdotal responses from the same subjects. Independently using cues derived from subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 Standard Version questionnaire, subjects identified tasks such as "bathing", "dressing", "climbing stairs", "housework", and "grocery shopping" as apparent barometers of a return to an acceptable level of physical and mental function. According to these written comments, the process of recovery from critical illness includes gradual reclamation of lost or diminished functional capacity. Contrary to extant literature, subjects did not comment on feeling better than they had previously, but did address "getting back to normal" as either a goal or an achievement. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: A future orientation is critical to maintaining health and function in mid and later life. Interpretations of subjective commentary related to hospitalization and its aftermath are both beneficial and essential to understanding age and gender differences and preferences among older ICU patients. Planning for interpretive components to functional outcomes research design will enhance the quality of the data, as well as the quality of the outcome, by allowing subjects to identify and articulate their post-hospitalization functional goals. Concurrent with this effort, design of restorative interventions, grounded in enhanced understanding of aged persons' subjective self-appraisals will help to ensure the health and autonomy that is central to a fulfilling and productive old age.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAged Patients' Perceptions of Outcomes After Critical Illnessen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMick, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Mick, PhD, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: diane_mick@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163751-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Translating statistical findings into human experience via examination of aged patients' written anecdotal perceptions of post-illness functional status is a valuable means for understanding the process of recovery from critical illness. Specific Aims: To enhance understanding of aged patients' ICU recovery experience. Framework: Grounded in ethics of age-based rationing of intensive care. Methods: Narrative analysis, as part of a larger prospective cohort study of patients (N = 104) (ages 65-95) from three ICUs at a northeastern academic medical center, was carried out on subjects' voluntary written personal observations and reflections from 1-month and 3-month follow-up questionnaires. Results and Conclusions: Evidence of the statistical predictive relationships, as found in the primary study, was discovered within the inherent continuity in 1-month and 3-month anecdotal responses from the same subjects. Independently using cues derived from subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 Standard Version questionnaire, subjects identified tasks such as "bathing", "dressing", "climbing stairs", "housework", and "grocery shopping" as apparent barometers of a return to an acceptable level of physical and mental function. According to these written comments, the process of recovery from critical illness includes gradual reclamation of lost or diminished functional capacity. Contrary to extant literature, subjects did not comment on feeling better than they had previously, but did address "getting back to normal" as either a goal or an achievement. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: A future orientation is critical to maintaining health and function in mid and later life. Interpretations of subjective commentary related to hospitalization and its aftermath are both beneficial and essential to understanding age and gender differences and preferences among older ICU patients. Planning for interpretive components to functional outcomes research design will enhance the quality of the data, as well as the quality of the outcome, by allowing subjects to identify and articulate their post-hospitalization functional goals. Concurrent with this effort, design of restorative interventions, grounded in enhanced understanding of aged persons' subjective self-appraisals will help to ensure the health and autonomy that is central to a fulfilling and productive old age.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:11Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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