2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163754
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research With Older Adults: Overcoming the Challenges
Author(s):
Resnick, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Resnick, MSN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: resnick@son.umaryland.edu
Abstract:
Until the 1980s, older adults were often excluded from clinical trials or from studies of diseases they are commonly affected by such as cardiovascular disease or cancer. Over the past two decades, however, there has been an increased recognition of the need to include this growing segment of the population in research. There is a now a National Institute of Aging at the National Institutes of Health, and organizations such as the Gerontological Society of American that strongly support research with older adults. While the basic ethical principles guiding research are no different for older adults when compared to younger subjects, the clinical realities of care of the older adult have a major impact on the actual conduct of research. Specifically, the challenges to nursing research with older adults include: (1) concerns about recruitment and retention of older participants; (2) measurement issues and the use of appropriate tools; and (3) collecting data from/with those with cognitive impairment Understanding these challenges and developing strategies to overcome them is essential to further our understanding of the health care needs of older adults, and to develop interventions to improve overall health and quality of life of these individuals. Trying to screen, recruit, and enroll older adults into studies is complicated by communication and cognitive problems, such as decreased hearing and vision, stroke and/or dementia. Certainly extra time is needed to help these individuals hear and understand what the research project is about, and what their options are in terms of participation. Special consideration must also be given to assessing the individuals' capacity to give informed consent for participation. There are a variety of tools used to do this, although standard measures of cognition and severity of dementia should not be taken as direct measures of ability to give consent. Determination of ability to consent may need to be made on a case by case basis, with inclusion of both a proxy for consent as well as assent by the cognitively impaired older subject. easurement issues related to research with older adults include developing and testing age appropriate scales, determining the most appropriate method of administration of the scale, and consideration of the scale length to avoid participant burden and fatigue. Repeatedly attempts have been made to use scales developed for adults with older individuals. Such attempts indicated that the measures for adults may use wording and contain items that are irrelevant for older adults. Careful consideration also needs to be given to method of administration. If a paper and pencil measure is given to older adults it is less likely that they will be able or willing to complete the measure. However, if an interview is done they are more likely to participate. Recommendations for choosing/developing appropriate measures for older adults should focus on: (1) method of administration; (2) item selection; and (3) length of the measure. There are special concerns with regard to research with older adults who have cognitive impairment. In addition to recruitment issues and obtaining consent, the collection of reliable data with these individuals is especially challenging. Moreover, the method of data collection used (i.e. proxy report versus observation) influences outcomes. Participation in this symposium will increase awareness of the many issues and challenges related to research with older adults, and participants will be exposed to techniques to overcome these challenges and facilitate the advancement of the science in the care of older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch With Older Adults: Overcoming the Challengesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorResnick, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Resnick, MSN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: resnick@son.umaryland.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163754-
dc.description.abstractUntil the 1980s, older adults were often excluded from clinical trials or from studies of diseases they are commonly affected by such as cardiovascular disease or cancer. Over the past two decades, however, there has been an increased recognition of the need to include this growing segment of the population in research. There is a now a National Institute of Aging at the National Institutes of Health, and organizations such as the Gerontological Society of American that strongly support research with older adults. While the basic ethical principles guiding research are no different for older adults when compared to younger subjects, the clinical realities of care of the older adult have a major impact on the actual conduct of research. Specifically, the challenges to nursing research with older adults include: (1) concerns about recruitment and retention of older participants; (2) measurement issues and the use of appropriate tools; and (3) collecting data from/with those with cognitive impairment Understanding these challenges and developing strategies to overcome them is essential to further our understanding of the health care needs of older adults, and to develop interventions to improve overall health and quality of life of these individuals. Trying to screen, recruit, and enroll older adults into studies is complicated by communication and cognitive problems, such as decreased hearing and vision, stroke and/or dementia. Certainly extra time is needed to help these individuals hear and understand what the research project is about, and what their options are in terms of participation. Special consideration must also be given to assessing the individuals' capacity to give informed consent for participation. There are a variety of tools used to do this, although standard measures of cognition and severity of dementia should not be taken as direct measures of ability to give consent. Determination of ability to consent may need to be made on a case by case basis, with inclusion of both a proxy for consent as well as assent by the cognitively impaired older subject. easurement issues related to research with older adults include developing and testing age appropriate scales, determining the most appropriate method of administration of the scale, and consideration of the scale length to avoid participant burden and fatigue. Repeatedly attempts have been made to use scales developed for adults with older individuals. Such attempts indicated that the measures for adults may use wording and contain items that are irrelevant for older adults. Careful consideration also needs to be given to method of administration. If a paper and pencil measure is given to older adults it is less likely that they will be able or willing to complete the measure. However, if an interview is done they are more likely to participate. Recommendations for choosing/developing appropriate measures for older adults should focus on: (1) method of administration; (2) item selection; and (3) length of the measure. There are special concerns with regard to research with older adults who have cognitive impairment. In addition to recruitment issues and obtaining consent, the collection of reliable data with these individuals is especially challenging. Moreover, the method of data collection used (i.e. proxy report versus observation) influences outcomes. Participation in this symposium will increase awareness of the many issues and challenges related to research with older adults, and participants will be exposed to techniques to overcome these challenges and facilitate the advancement of the science in the care of older adults.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:14Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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