2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163755
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measurement Issues With Older Adults: One Scale Doesn't Fit All
Author(s):
Resnick, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Resnick, MSN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: resnick@son.umaryland.edu
Abstract:
Many of the tools developed for use in nursing and behavioral research were developed for adults, often those less than 65 years of age. While the concepts of interest when doing research with older adults are often the same as they are with younger individuals (i.e. quality of life, health status, pain), the measures developed for adults may not be appropriate for the older adult. Specifically these measures may require significant revisions in wording, elimination of items and/or inclusion of alternative items, or a change in method of administration. Common Problems with Using Previously Developed Measures with Older Adults - Pilot testing of measures must be done to determine not only the reliability and validity, but the appropriateness of the use of the measure with the older adults. Three examples of use of conceptually significant tools with older adults and the problems associated with these tools, as well as the subsequent revisions will be presented. The three tools include the: (1) self-motivation inventory (Dishman, 1981); (2) Short-Form 12-Item Health Status Questionnaire (Ware, Kosinkski, & Keller); and (3) Barriers and Benefits of Exercise Scale (Steinhart & Dishman, 1989). In a sample of older adults in a rehabilitation setting, the self-motivation inventory was found to contain language that was misleading and irrelevant to the older adult. Moreover, this measure was developed to be a paper and pencil test, but the older adults were either unable or unwilling to complete a written test secondary to visual concerns and fatigue. They were, however, willing to participate and answer questions when interviewed. The SF-12, when tested with older adults, did not hold the same structure as the hypothesized model with adults. Therefore it was necessary to alter the factor structure and the scoring of the measure. In addition it was not appropriate to use the standardized method of scoring for the SF-12 as it was developed for younger individuals. Lastly, the Barriers and Benefits of Exercise scale asked about benefits and barriers to exercise for younger adults that were not relevant to the older adult such as lack of time, alteration in body image, and increasing life expectancy. The older participants also complained that the measure was redundant. Recommendations for Revisions/Development of Age Specific Measures - Based on these findings it is recommended that revisions of measures used with adults consider: (1) method of administration: so that if at all possible written testing is avoided; (2) item selection: qualitative research and/or focus groups should be used with pilot testing to help develop appropriate items; and (3) length: measures should be short, and to the point. The development of a new measure for outcome expectations for exercise specific to older adults will be used as an example of how each of these areas can be addressed. Assuring that the measures selected are appropriate for the older adult will increase the validity of these measures, improve the reliability and allow us to increase our base of knowledge in the many areas of geriatric care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasurement Issues With Older Adults: One Scale Doesn't Fit Allen_GB
dc.contributor.authorResnick, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Resnick, MSN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: resnick@son.umaryland.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163755-
dc.description.abstractMany of the tools developed for use in nursing and behavioral research were developed for adults, often those less than 65 years of age. While the concepts of interest when doing research with older adults are often the same as they are with younger individuals (i.e. quality of life, health status, pain), the measures developed for adults may not be appropriate for the older adult. Specifically these measures may require significant revisions in wording, elimination of items and/or inclusion of alternative items, or a change in method of administration. Common Problems with Using Previously Developed Measures with Older Adults - Pilot testing of measures must be done to determine not only the reliability and validity, but the appropriateness of the use of the measure with the older adults. Three examples of use of conceptually significant tools with older adults and the problems associated with these tools, as well as the subsequent revisions will be presented. The three tools include the: (1) self-motivation inventory (Dishman, 1981); (2) Short-Form 12-Item Health Status Questionnaire (Ware, Kosinkski, & Keller); and (3) Barriers and Benefits of Exercise Scale (Steinhart & Dishman, 1989). In a sample of older adults in a rehabilitation setting, the self-motivation inventory was found to contain language that was misleading and irrelevant to the older adult. Moreover, this measure was developed to be a paper and pencil test, but the older adults were either unable or unwilling to complete a written test secondary to visual concerns and fatigue. They were, however, willing to participate and answer questions when interviewed. The SF-12, when tested with older adults, did not hold the same structure as the hypothesized model with adults. Therefore it was necessary to alter the factor structure and the scoring of the measure. In addition it was not appropriate to use the standardized method of scoring for the SF-12 as it was developed for younger individuals. Lastly, the Barriers and Benefits of Exercise scale asked about benefits and barriers to exercise for younger adults that were not relevant to the older adult such as lack of time, alteration in body image, and increasing life expectancy. The older participants also complained that the measure was redundant. Recommendations for Revisions/Development of Age Specific Measures - Based on these findings it is recommended that revisions of measures used with adults consider: (1) method of administration: so that if at all possible written testing is avoided; (2) item selection: qualitative research and/or focus groups should be used with pilot testing to help develop appropriate items; and (3) length: measures should be short, and to the point. The development of a new measure for outcome expectations for exercise specific to older adults will be used as an example of how each of these areas can be addressed. Assuring that the measures selected are appropriate for the older adult will increase the validity of these measures, improve the reliability and allow us to increase our base of knowledge in the many areas of geriatric care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:15Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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