2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163757
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment and Retention of Older Adults in Clinical Research
Author(s):
Shaughnessy, Marianne
Author Details:
Marianne Shaughnessy, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, School of Nursing, Department of Adult Health Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: shaughne@son.umaryland.edu
Abstract:
The most critical step in implementation of a study is recruitment of an appropriate number of qualified subjects. Failure to achieve recruitment goals can compromise a study by providing too few subjects for analysis, and efforts at additional recruitment may result in uneven workloads, extension of the study and budget overruns. Relaxation of the inclusion criteria may further affect the results in an unpredictable way. Once recruited into a study, the next challenge for investigators is to retain enrollees. This is particularly important in studies with older adults who may be lost to follow up due to changes in living situation, acute illness, or death. Retention in longitudinal studies also may be affected by subject's inadequate understanding of the study protocol, or unpleasant experiences as a result of early study participation. The importance of careful planning prior to initiation of a study with older adults to ensure sufficient participation cannot be overstated. Common Problems in Recruitment and Retention: Inadequate planning and adaptation of recruitment strategies is a major problem for many clinical studies. Definition of the eligible population is often overestimated, and a specific type of population sought may introduce additional barriers to recruitment (e.g. outpatient vs. inpatient, disease-specific vs. prevention). The recruitment of older adults into clinical studies is further complicated by visual, hearing, literacy and cognitive issues, which can influence understanding of protocols and therefore informed consent. Older adults also have less functional reserve and may have a lower threshold for respondent burden than younger adults. Lack of transportation or time may also preclude study participation. Finally, mistrust of investigators by potential enrollees or their families may create reluctance to participate. Commonly used strategies to recruit community-based study participants are: physician referrals, presentation to community/church groups or free screenings, media, mailings, fliers, or telephone solicitations. The literature suggests that multiple overlapping strategies are necessary to meet recruitment goals and that continual monitoring and adaptation of strategies as appropriate is imperative to successful, continued recruitment. Longitudinal studies require attention to patient as partner to ensure continued participation over time. Examples from several moderate and large clinical trials will be utilized to illustrate successful use of multiple methods. Discussion/Recommendations: Successful recruitment and retention of older adults in clinical studies is based on incorporating six fundamental concepts: 1) historical cognizance; 2) sanctioning; 3) trust-building; 4) mutuality; 5) recognition of heterogeneity; and 6) researcher self-reflection and introspection (Dennis & Neese, 2000). Examples of how these concepts were used in the recruitment and retention of participants in the Baltimore VA Pepper/OAIC and Baltimore hip studies will be provided. Use of this framework is an effective way for novice and experienced nurse researchers to recruit and retain older adults and their families as partners in research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment and Retention of Older Adults in Clinical Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShaughnessy, Marianneen_US
dc.author.detailsMarianne Shaughnessy, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, School of Nursing, Department of Adult Health Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: shaughne@son.umaryland.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163757-
dc.description.abstractThe most critical step in implementation of a study is recruitment of an appropriate number of qualified subjects. Failure to achieve recruitment goals can compromise a study by providing too few subjects for analysis, and efforts at additional recruitment may result in uneven workloads, extension of the study and budget overruns. Relaxation of the inclusion criteria may further affect the results in an unpredictable way. Once recruited into a study, the next challenge for investigators is to retain enrollees. This is particularly important in studies with older adults who may be lost to follow up due to changes in living situation, acute illness, or death. Retention in longitudinal studies also may be affected by subject's inadequate understanding of the study protocol, or unpleasant experiences as a result of early study participation. The importance of careful planning prior to initiation of a study with older adults to ensure sufficient participation cannot be overstated. Common Problems in Recruitment and Retention: Inadequate planning and adaptation of recruitment strategies is a major problem for many clinical studies. Definition of the eligible population is often overestimated, and a specific type of population sought may introduce additional barriers to recruitment (e.g. outpatient vs. inpatient, disease-specific vs. prevention). The recruitment of older adults into clinical studies is further complicated by visual, hearing, literacy and cognitive issues, which can influence understanding of protocols and therefore informed consent. Older adults also have less functional reserve and may have a lower threshold for respondent burden than younger adults. Lack of transportation or time may also preclude study participation. Finally, mistrust of investigators by potential enrollees or their families may create reluctance to participate. Commonly used strategies to recruit community-based study participants are: physician referrals, presentation to community/church groups or free screenings, media, mailings, fliers, or telephone solicitations. The literature suggests that multiple overlapping strategies are necessary to meet recruitment goals and that continual monitoring and adaptation of strategies as appropriate is imperative to successful, continued recruitment. Longitudinal studies require attention to patient as partner to ensure continued participation over time. Examples from several moderate and large clinical trials will be utilized to illustrate successful use of multiple methods. Discussion/Recommendations: Successful recruitment and retention of older adults in clinical studies is based on incorporating six fundamental concepts: 1) historical cognizance; 2) sanctioning; 3) trust-building; 4) mutuality; 5) recognition of heterogeneity; and 6) researcher self-reflection and introspection (Dennis & Neese, 2000). Examples of how these concepts were used in the recruitment and retention of participants in the Baltimore VA Pepper/OAIC and Baltimore hip studies will be provided. Use of this framework is an effective way for novice and experienced nurse researchers to recruit and retain older adults and their families as partners in research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:18Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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