Development And Evaluation Of An Instrument To Measure Attitudes Toward Nurse Practitioners As Competent Primary Care Providers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163760
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development And Evaluation Of An Instrument To Measure Attitudes Toward Nurse Practitioners As Competent Primary Care Providers
Author(s):
Alexander, Ivy
Author Details:
Ivy Alexander, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: ivy.alexander@yale.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the development of the Attitudes Toward Nurse Practitioners as Competent Primary Care Providers instrument, and methods used to evaluate content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency reliability. Research question(s) or specific aim(s): Development of an instrument to measure attitude toward nurse practitioner (NP) competence as a primary care provider (PCP). Framework: Attitude is correlated with behavior. In the arena of primary care (PC), a favorable or unfavorable attitude about competence for a specific provider, or group of providers, to perform primary care functions is highly relevant to the behavior of using that provider, or group of providers, for care. This framework is important in the present study since a positive attitude toward NP competence, as a PCP, is likely to positively impact use and acceptance of NPs as PCPs. Methods: A 14-item instrument was developed after reviewing the literature to identify NP functions as a PCP. Practicing PCPs and NP faculty in a PC curriculum provided expert panel review for content validity. Attitude toward NP competence in two primary care functions (implementing treatment/management plans and client education) was measured using a five-point Likert scale. Following revisions based on expert review; the 12-item instrument was administered to 73 bachelor of nursing students. Preliminary construct validity was attempted using exploratory factor analysis. Output was terminated because one variable communality was > 1.0. Analysis of the initial statistics communalities and correlation matrix revealed an unusually high correlation between item nine and the other instrument variables. This was confirmed using reliability analysis (corrected total item correlation for item 9 = .76). Results and conclusions: Principal factor analysis, with item nine omitted, revealed a single factor accounting for 45.6% of the total variance. Chronbach's alpha internal consistency for the scale was .90, indicating that 90% of the total variance in the scores can be estimated as true variance. Mean scores and standard deviations indicated adequate representation of range in responses and the items correlated well with the remainder of the items in the scale (except item seven, which correlated .44 with the other items). ). The preliminary findings from this pilot study of limited data suggest that the instrument may represent a single construct. This makes conceptual sense as most consumers see 'primary care' as a cohesive activity. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: The current study presents an instrument that may be useful in identifying consumer attitudes toward NPs as competent PCPs. Additional testing, with samples that represent broad consumer groups and additional items representing other PC functions, is recommended. Additional knowledge regarding consumer attitudes can offer information about how well NPs are accepted, direct public education efforts, and guide expectations for consumer use.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment And Evaluation Of An Instrument To Measure Attitudes Toward Nurse Practitioners As Competent Primary Care Providersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Ivyen_US
dc.author.detailsIvy Alexander, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: ivy.alexander@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163760-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the development of the Attitudes Toward Nurse Practitioners as Competent Primary Care Providers instrument, and methods used to evaluate content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency reliability. Research question(s) or specific aim(s): Development of an instrument to measure attitude toward nurse practitioner (NP) competence as a primary care provider (PCP). Framework: Attitude is correlated with behavior. In the arena of primary care (PC), a favorable or unfavorable attitude about competence for a specific provider, or group of providers, to perform primary care functions is highly relevant to the behavior of using that provider, or group of providers, for care. This framework is important in the present study since a positive attitude toward NP competence, as a PCP, is likely to positively impact use and acceptance of NPs as PCPs. Methods: A 14-item instrument was developed after reviewing the literature to identify NP functions as a PCP. Practicing PCPs and NP faculty in a PC curriculum provided expert panel review for content validity. Attitude toward NP competence in two primary care functions (implementing treatment/management plans and client education) was measured using a five-point Likert scale. Following revisions based on expert review; the 12-item instrument was administered to 73 bachelor of nursing students. Preliminary construct validity was attempted using exploratory factor analysis. Output was terminated because one variable communality was > 1.0. Analysis of the initial statistics communalities and correlation matrix revealed an unusually high correlation between item nine and the other instrument variables. This was confirmed using reliability analysis (corrected total item correlation for item 9 = .76). Results and conclusions: Principal factor analysis, with item nine omitted, revealed a single factor accounting for 45.6% of the total variance. Chronbach's alpha internal consistency for the scale was .90, indicating that 90% of the total variance in the scores can be estimated as true variance. Mean scores and standard deviations indicated adequate representation of range in responses and the items correlated well with the remainder of the items in the scale (except item seven, which correlated .44 with the other items). ). The preliminary findings from this pilot study of limited data suggest that the instrument may represent a single construct. This makes conceptual sense as most consumers see 'primary care' as a cohesive activity. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: The current study presents an instrument that may be useful in identifying consumer attitudes toward NPs as competent PCPs. Additional testing, with samples that represent broad consumer groups and additional items representing other PC functions, is recommended. Additional knowledge regarding consumer attitudes can offer information about how well NPs are accepted, direct public education efforts, and guide expectations for consumer use.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:21Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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