Development And Evaluation Of An Instrument To Measure Attitudes Toward Online Health Care (ATOHC)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163762
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development And Evaluation Of An Instrument To Measure Attitudes Toward Online Health Care (ATOHC)
Author(s):
LaCoursiere, Sheryl
Author Details:
Sheryl LaCoursiere, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: sheryl.lacoursiere@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the development of the Attitudes Toward Online Health Care (ATOHC) instrument, and methods used to assess content and construct validity and alpha internal consistency reliability, using common factor analysis. Research question(s) or specific aim(s): What are the salient dimensions of online health care, as perceived by the patient? Framework: The Online Social Support Theory (LaCoursiere, 1999) was the conceptual framework utilized for this study. Methods: The 51-question instrument was developed based on literature and industry trends, and underwent quantitative and qualitative judicial review with international nurse, physician, and other health care judges for content validity. A 5-point Likert scale was used to assess individual's responses to their attitudes toward online health care professionals, trust, anticipated outcomes, and health care content. After two revisions, the ATOHC questionnaire was then administered online to 265 participants who utilized Internet websites and listservs for health care support. Results and conclusions: The sample was primarily middle aged (mean= 46.5 years). Common Factor Analysis of the data revealed 11 initial eigenvalues greater than 1, however on extraction the number decreased to 6. The analysis was re-run, forcing a 6-factor solution, however only five eigenvalues greater than one emerged. The analysis was then re-run, forcing a 5-factor solution. The five identified dimensions in this sample were: (I) Community and News- supportive exchanges from other patients with similar conditions, and receipt of relevant information from other patients as well as health care professionals; (II) Outcomes- psychological and physical changes in the individual as a result of having participated in online health care; (III) Trusted Information and Advice- confidence in information provided by health authority figures and organizations; (IV) Self-Efficacy in Evaluating Information and Intention- the individual's belief in their ability to evaluate the quality of the information that they receive, the qualifications of those providing it, and the intent of the requestor; and (V), Disclosure- an individual's willingness to provide personally identifiable information. Reliability data revealed that after 10 items were deleted, alphas for the dimensions of the revised instrument ranged from .62 to .95, with precision of alpha ranging from .00 to .02. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: Understanding of the relevant factors that individuals seek when participating in online health care will enable specifically targeted interventions based on user needs. Further analysis of subscores will enable determination of possible differences based on demographic profiles, for instance by age, gender, and medical condition. Testing of the revised instrument on a larger sample will provide the basis for a shorter version of the questionnaire, which can be used for a more rapid assessment with a wide variety of audiences, particularly health care institutions and agencies who seek to evaluate their particular users needs for online patient education and support.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment And Evaluation Of An Instrument To Measure Attitudes Toward Online Health Care (ATOHC)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaCoursiere, Sherylen_US
dc.author.detailsSheryl LaCoursiere, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: sheryl.lacoursiere@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163762-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the development of the Attitudes Toward Online Health Care (ATOHC) instrument, and methods used to assess content and construct validity and alpha internal consistency reliability, using common factor analysis. Research question(s) or specific aim(s): What are the salient dimensions of online health care, as perceived by the patient? Framework: The Online Social Support Theory (LaCoursiere, 1999) was the conceptual framework utilized for this study. Methods: The 51-question instrument was developed based on literature and industry trends, and underwent quantitative and qualitative judicial review with international nurse, physician, and other health care judges for content validity. A 5-point Likert scale was used to assess individual's responses to their attitudes toward online health care professionals, trust, anticipated outcomes, and health care content. After two revisions, the ATOHC questionnaire was then administered online to 265 participants who utilized Internet websites and listservs for health care support. Results and conclusions: The sample was primarily middle aged (mean= 46.5 years). Common Factor Analysis of the data revealed 11 initial eigenvalues greater than 1, however on extraction the number decreased to 6. The analysis was re-run, forcing a 6-factor solution, however only five eigenvalues greater than one emerged. The analysis was then re-run, forcing a 5-factor solution. The five identified dimensions in this sample were: (I) Community and News- supportive exchanges from other patients with similar conditions, and receipt of relevant information from other patients as well as health care professionals; (II) Outcomes- psychological and physical changes in the individual as a result of having participated in online health care; (III) Trusted Information and Advice- confidence in information provided by health authority figures and organizations; (IV) Self-Efficacy in Evaluating Information and Intention- the individual's belief in their ability to evaluate the quality of the information that they receive, the qualifications of those providing it, and the intent of the requestor; and (V), Disclosure- an individual's willingness to provide personally identifiable information. Reliability data revealed that after 10 items were deleted, alphas for the dimensions of the revised instrument ranged from .62 to .95, with precision of alpha ranging from .00 to .02. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: Understanding of the relevant factors that individuals seek when participating in online health care will enable specifically targeted interventions based on user needs. Further analysis of subscores will enable determination of possible differences based on demographic profiles, for instance by age, gender, and medical condition. Testing of the revised instrument on a larger sample will provide the basis for a shorter version of the questionnaire, which can be used for a more rapid assessment with a wide variety of audiences, particularly health care institutions and agencies who seek to evaluate their particular users needs for online patient education and support.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:23Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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