2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163763
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Initial Development Of The Alzheimer's Disease Behavior Scale (ADBS)
Author(s):
Comshaw, Richard
Author Details:
Richard Comshaw, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: richard.comshaw@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Research question(s) or specific aim(s): (1) What is the evidence to support content validity of the ADBS? (2) What is the internal consistency and two-week stability of the ADBS in persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease? (3) What is the concurrent validity of the ADBS in mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease when compared to the MMSE? (4) Is there a difference in ADBS total scores in persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease and those who are diagnosed with depression, vascular dementia and normal controls? (5) What is the sensitivity and specificity of the ADBS in mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease? (6) What are the positive and negative predictive values of the ADBS? (7) What is the interrater agreement of the informants and family members? Framework: Modeling and Role Modeling A Theory and Paradigm for Nursing (Erickson, Tomlin & Swain, 1983). Methods: The ADBS was developed as a 74-item, 5-point response scale instrument. Content validity was assured via panel of expert judges. The instrument was then administered concurrently with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), using family members and nursing aides in a nursing home as informants. Nursing home residents were assigned to one of five groups: mild Alzheimer's Disease, moderate Alzheimer's Disease, vascular dementia, depressed and normal control. Two week retest reliability was conducted for stability analysis. Results: Item analysis was conducted to assess adequacy of the ADBS. Cronbach's alpha was calculated on each dimension and the scale as a whole, as well as two-week stability. Concurrent validity was determined by calculating the correlation between the ADBS and MMSE scores. Differences between ADBS total scores in the five groups were assessed by ANOVA. Receiver operating characteristics for positive and negative predictive validity were used to assess ADBS sensitivity and specificity. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: Currently, there is no systematic means of assessment of the daily function of Alzheimer's Disease patients. The ADBS could be used for early case finding and appropriate counseling, needs assessment, nursing care planning to maximize strengths and compensate for weaknesses, and evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions and medication regimes. It may be used across multiple nursing settings, from outpatient to acute and long term care. Additionally, it may be used to assess individual changes in transitions from community to institutional living, and provides a means for families and caregivers to objectively identify evolving needs of the Alzheimer's Disease patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInitial Development Of The Alzheimer's Disease Behavior Scale (ADBS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorComshaw, Richarden_US
dc.author.detailsRichard Comshaw, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: richard.comshaw@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163763-
dc.description.abstractResearch question(s) or specific aim(s): (1) What is the evidence to support content validity of the ADBS? (2) What is the internal consistency and two-week stability of the ADBS in persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease? (3) What is the concurrent validity of the ADBS in mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease when compared to the MMSE? (4) Is there a difference in ADBS total scores in persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease and those who are diagnosed with depression, vascular dementia and normal controls? (5) What is the sensitivity and specificity of the ADBS in mild and moderate Alzheimer's Disease? (6) What are the positive and negative predictive values of the ADBS? (7) What is the interrater agreement of the informants and family members? Framework: Modeling and Role Modeling A Theory and Paradigm for Nursing (Erickson, Tomlin & Swain, 1983). Methods: The ADBS was developed as a 74-item, 5-point response scale instrument. Content validity was assured via panel of expert judges. The instrument was then administered concurrently with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), using family members and nursing aides in a nursing home as informants. Nursing home residents were assigned to one of five groups: mild Alzheimer's Disease, moderate Alzheimer's Disease, vascular dementia, depressed and normal control. Two week retest reliability was conducted for stability analysis. Results: Item analysis was conducted to assess adequacy of the ADBS. Cronbach's alpha was calculated on each dimension and the scale as a whole, as well as two-week stability. Concurrent validity was determined by calculating the correlation between the ADBS and MMSE scores. Differences between ADBS total scores in the five groups were assessed by ANOVA. Receiver operating characteristics for positive and negative predictive validity were used to assess ADBS sensitivity and specificity. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: Currently, there is no systematic means of assessment of the daily function of Alzheimer's Disease patients. The ADBS could be used for early case finding and appropriate counseling, needs assessment, nursing care planning to maximize strengths and compensate for weaknesses, and evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions and medication regimes. It may be used across multiple nursing settings, from outpatient to acute and long term care. Additionally, it may be used to assess individual changes in transitions from community to institutional living, and provides a means for families and caregivers to objectively identify evolving needs of the Alzheimer's Disease patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:24Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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