2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163764
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Related to the Development of Trust in Parents of Hospitalized Children
Author(s):
Thompson, Virginia
Author Details:
Virginia Thompson, Pennsylvania State University, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: vlt103@psu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Trust is an important component in the development of a therapeutic relationship. Factors related to the development of trust in the nurse-patient relationship, and in the nurse-family relationship have been studied with adult patients, but there has been little research related to trust with the parents of hospitalized children and the nurses caring for these children. Thus, the purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the factors that may facilitate or inhibit the development of trust between parents of hospitalized children and the staff caring for their children. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to increase understanding of the variable, trust, in the context of the relationship between parents of hospitalized children and the staff caring for these children. Framework: This qualitative study used a grounded theory approach to understand the experiences of parents whose children have been hospitalized. Methods: Semi-structured, interactive, tape-recorded interviews were conducted with 11 parents of children who had been hospitalized for a variety of clinical conditions, both acute and chronic. These interview focused on the parents' experiences during their child's hospitalization. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a constant comparative process. Results/Conclusions: Trust emerged as the most important aspect or "need" of the parents in this study. The three themes that emerged from the interviews influenced the development and maintenance of trust in the staff. These themes were the need for staff to: "be warm;" show concern for the needs of both the child and the parent; and demonstrate that they care about the child, as a person, and not just an illness. Parents expressed concerns that they could not trust staff to care for their child if they did not believe the staff could meet their child's emotional, as well as physical needs. Trust was also influenced by prior experiences with the staff. Parents whose child suffered from an acute condition, involving only one hospitalization, had a difficult time developing enough trust in the staff to leave their child's bedside. One mother reported that she did not have a real meal, or even leave her child's bedside to shower, during the five-day hospitalization. In contrast, those parents whose child suffered from a chronic condition, involving multiple hospitalizations, developed trust over the course of their child's illness, and were more comfortable leaving their child in the staff's care. Implications for practice: By gaining an understanding of these experiences and the relationship of factors related to trust development, we will expand understanding of the concept of trust, as well as provide meaningful information that can be utilized by nurses caring for hospitalized children and their families. Strategies can then be developed to enhance the development of trust between parents of hospitalized children and the nurses caring for these children, with an ultimate goal of positively affecting the health outcomes of these children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Related to the Development of Trust in Parents of Hospitalized Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Virginiaen_US
dc.author.detailsVirginia Thompson, Pennsylvania State University, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: vlt103@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163764-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Trust is an important component in the development of a therapeutic relationship. Factors related to the development of trust in the nurse-patient relationship, and in the nurse-family relationship have been studied with adult patients, but there has been little research related to trust with the parents of hospitalized children and the nurses caring for these children. Thus, the purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the factors that may facilitate or inhibit the development of trust between parents of hospitalized children and the staff caring for their children. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to increase understanding of the variable, trust, in the context of the relationship between parents of hospitalized children and the staff caring for these children. Framework: This qualitative study used a grounded theory approach to understand the experiences of parents whose children have been hospitalized. Methods: Semi-structured, interactive, tape-recorded interviews were conducted with 11 parents of children who had been hospitalized for a variety of clinical conditions, both acute and chronic. These interview focused on the parents' experiences during their child's hospitalization. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a constant comparative process. Results/Conclusions: Trust emerged as the most important aspect or "need" of the parents in this study. The three themes that emerged from the interviews influenced the development and maintenance of trust in the staff. These themes were the need for staff to: "be warm;" show concern for the needs of both the child and the parent; and demonstrate that they care about the child, as a person, and not just an illness. Parents expressed concerns that they could not trust staff to care for their child if they did not believe the staff could meet their child's emotional, as well as physical needs. Trust was also influenced by prior experiences with the staff. Parents whose child suffered from an acute condition, involving only one hospitalization, had a difficult time developing enough trust in the staff to leave their child's bedside. One mother reported that she did not have a real meal, or even leave her child's bedside to shower, during the five-day hospitalization. In contrast, those parents whose child suffered from a chronic condition, involving multiple hospitalizations, developed trust over the course of their child's illness, and were more comfortable leaving their child in the staff's care. Implications for practice: By gaining an understanding of these experiences and the relationship of factors related to trust development, we will expand understanding of the concept of trust, as well as provide meaningful information that can be utilized by nurses caring for hospitalized children and their families. Strategies can then be developed to enhance the development of trust between parents of hospitalized children and the nurses caring for these children, with an ultimate goal of positively affecting the health outcomes of these children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:25Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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