2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163765
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anxiety And Postoperative Pain In Children Undergoing Major Orthopaedic Surgery
Author(s):
LaMontagne, Lynda
Author Details:
Lynda LaMontagne, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: lynda.lamontagne@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Anxiety and pain are major concerns not only for children undergoing surgery, but also for their parents and health care professionals. A convenience sample of 74 adolescents undergoing major orthopaedic surgery for repair of idiopathic scoliosis and their parents was used to investigate the relationships among children's and parents' preoperative and postoperative anxiety and children's postoperative pain. Age-appropriate versions of Spielberger's State-Anxiety scales measured children's and parents' anxiety and a Visual Analogue Scale assessed children's pain intensities. Children's state anxiety increased from preoperative to postoperative levels and their postoperative anxiety levels positively related to their pain intensities on days 2 and 4 following the operation. Parents' anxiety decreased from preoperative to postoperative levels and their postoperative anxiety positively related to their children's postoperative anxiety. Studying both parents and children helped to explain the variance in children's self-reported anxiety. Parents' emotional states are important indicators of children's emotional states and subsequently their pain experience. The results of this study suggest that allowing children to assist in the assessment of their postoperative pain may help health care professionals better understand the subjective component of pain. The findings also emphasize the importance of including parents in future studies when the aim is to understand children's behavioral responses and recovery outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnxiety And Postoperative Pain In Children Undergoing Major Orthopaedic Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaMontagne, Lyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsLynda LaMontagne, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: lynda.lamontagne@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163765-
dc.description.abstractAnxiety and pain are major concerns not only for children undergoing surgery, but also for their parents and health care professionals. A convenience sample of 74 adolescents undergoing major orthopaedic surgery for repair of idiopathic scoliosis and their parents was used to investigate the relationships among children's and parents' preoperative and postoperative anxiety and children's postoperative pain. Age-appropriate versions of Spielberger's State-Anxiety scales measured children's and parents' anxiety and a Visual Analogue Scale assessed children's pain intensities. Children's state anxiety increased from preoperative to postoperative levels and their postoperative anxiety levels positively related to their pain intensities on days 2 and 4 following the operation. Parents' anxiety decreased from preoperative to postoperative levels and their postoperative anxiety positively related to their children's postoperative anxiety. Studying both parents and children helped to explain the variance in children's self-reported anxiety. Parents' emotional states are important indicators of children's emotional states and subsequently their pain experience. The results of this study suggest that allowing children to assist in the assessment of their postoperative pain may help health care professionals better understand the subjective component of pain. The findings also emphasize the importance of including parents in future studies when the aim is to understand children's behavioral responses and recovery outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:26Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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