2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163767
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience Of Long Term Parental Bereavement
Author(s):
Smith, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Smith, Barry University, School of Nursing, Miami Shores, Florida, USA, email: csmith@mail.barry.edu
Abstract:
The death of a child is one of the most tragic events that can enter a family's life. The event is said to bring life long changes to the bereaved parents, but little has been documented in a scientific, rigorous manner. Although the process of bereavement in general has been studied at various times, long term parental bereavement research has been absent from the literature. This study explored the lived experience of long term parental bereavement utilizing hermeneutic phenomenology. A convenience sample of 12 bereaved parents, whose children died 4 to 20 years prior, was interviewed and audiotaped. The tapes were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for repeated themes. The data analysis procedure used was the Giorgi method. When all 12 transcripts were compared, a list of 16 common themes was formed. From the list of themes emerged a group of dimensions that described the lived experience of long term parental bereavement. The dimensions were Chronic Sorrow, Moving On, Support Network, Parental Guilt, After Death Contacts, and Telling the Story. Standards of rigor were maintained by peer debriefing, member checking, and audit by an independent reviewer. The implications for nursing are many. The analysis of the qualitative data revealed that parental grief continues without end. In practice, incorporating supportive measures allows the parents to express their grief in a safe, positive, and nonjudgmental atmosphere and permit the parents to talk openly about their deceased child. Nurses can provide referrals to appropriate community support services. Recommendations for future nursing research, including minority parental bereavement experiences, are also addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience Of Long Term Parental Bereavementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Smith, Barry University, School of Nursing, Miami Shores, Florida, USA, email: csmith@mail.barry.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163767-
dc.description.abstractThe death of a child is one of the most tragic events that can enter a family's life. The event is said to bring life long changes to the bereaved parents, but little has been documented in a scientific, rigorous manner. Although the process of bereavement in general has been studied at various times, long term parental bereavement research has been absent from the literature. This study explored the lived experience of long term parental bereavement utilizing hermeneutic phenomenology. A convenience sample of 12 bereaved parents, whose children died 4 to 20 years prior, was interviewed and audiotaped. The tapes were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for repeated themes. The data analysis procedure used was the Giorgi method. When all 12 transcripts were compared, a list of 16 common themes was formed. From the list of themes emerged a group of dimensions that described the lived experience of long term parental bereavement. The dimensions were Chronic Sorrow, Moving On, Support Network, Parental Guilt, After Death Contacts, and Telling the Story. Standards of rigor were maintained by peer debriefing, member checking, and audit by an independent reviewer. The implications for nursing are many. The analysis of the qualitative data revealed that parental grief continues without end. In practice, incorporating supportive measures allows the parents to express their grief in a safe, positive, and nonjudgmental atmosphere and permit the parents to talk openly about their deceased child. Nurses can provide referrals to appropriate community support services. Recommendations for future nursing research, including minority parental bereavement experiences, are also addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:28Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.