2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163768
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predicting Cigarette Smoking Among College Students
Author(s):
Hanson, Mary Jane
Author Details:
Mary Jane Hanson, PhD, Director of Graduate Program, University of Scranton, Department of Nursing, Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hansonm2@uofs.edu
Abstract:
Increased levels of cigarette use have been reported among college students. The aim of this study was to determine the adequacy of the Theory of Planned Behavior in predicting smoking intention and behavior among college students. Baseline data, including measures of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention, were obtained from 79 females and 70 males. Self-report on smoking behavior was obtained 6 months after baseline data collection from 72 females and 55 males. The three independent variables (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control) accounted for 74% of the variance in intention to smoke among females and 60% among males. In both groups, however, only attitude and perceived behavioral control contributed significantly to smoking intention; subjective norm did not. With regard to actual smoking behavior, intention was found to be a significant predictor of smoking behavior both among females ( =.72, p< .01) and among males ( =.55, p< .01), accounting for 52% and 31% of the variance, respectively. Among females, the addition of perceived behavioral control to intention in the prediction of smoking behavior increased the variance from 52% to 60%. Both intention (=.38, p< .01) and perceived behavioral control ( = -.45, p< .01) were found to be significant predictors of behavior among women. Among males, however, perceived behavioral control was not found to be a significant predictor of behavior. Only intention was found to predict smoking behavior in males. Overall, the present study provides support for the usefulness of the Theory of Planned Behavior in understanding cigarette smoking. Moreover, gender differences were found regarding the prediction of smoking. Study findings suggest that gender specific smoking prevention interventions, based on the theory concepts, should be developed and tested to help decrease the prevalence of cigarette smoking among college students.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredicting Cigarette Smoking Among College Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Mary Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Jane Hanson, PhD, Director of Graduate Program, University of Scranton, Department of Nursing, Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hansonm2@uofs.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163768-
dc.description.abstractIncreased levels of cigarette use have been reported among college students. The aim of this study was to determine the adequacy of the Theory of Planned Behavior in predicting smoking intention and behavior among college students. Baseline data, including measures of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention, were obtained from 79 females and 70 males. Self-report on smoking behavior was obtained 6 months after baseline data collection from 72 females and 55 males. The three independent variables (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control) accounted for 74% of the variance in intention to smoke among females and 60% among males. In both groups, however, only attitude and perceived behavioral control contributed significantly to smoking intention; subjective norm did not. With regard to actual smoking behavior, intention was found to be a significant predictor of smoking behavior both among females ( =.72, p< .01) and among males ( =.55, p< .01), accounting for 52% and 31% of the variance, respectively. Among females, the addition of perceived behavioral control to intention in the prediction of smoking behavior increased the variance from 52% to 60%. Both intention (=.38, p< .01) and perceived behavioral control ( = -.45, p< .01) were found to be significant predictors of behavior among women. Among males, however, perceived behavioral control was not found to be a significant predictor of behavior. Only intention was found to predict smoking behavior in males. Overall, the present study provides support for the usefulness of the Theory of Planned Behavior in understanding cigarette smoking. Moreover, gender differences were found regarding the prediction of smoking. Study findings suggest that gender specific smoking prevention interventions, based on the theory concepts, should be developed and tested to help decrease the prevalence of cigarette smoking among college students.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:29Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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