2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163770
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing The Impact Of The WALC Intervention On Exercise Adherence In Older Adults
Author(s):
Resnick, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Resnick, MSN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: resnick@son.umaryland.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to test the feasibility of the WALC intervention (Walk, Address pain, fear, fatigue during exercise; Learn about exercise; Cue by self-modeling), and determine its effects on: (1) self-efficacy and outcome expectations; (2) exercise activity and free living activity; (3) physical and mental health status; and (4) falls and fall related injuries. Research Questions: It was hypothesized that exposure to the WALC intervention would increase self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, increase exercise and free living activity, improve physical and mental health, and decrease falls and fall related injuries. Framework: The theory of self-efficacy suggests that the stronger the individuals' efficacy expectations, the more likely they will initiate and persist with a given activity. Efficacy expectations are dynamic and are both appraised and enhanced by four mechanisms: (1) enactive mastery experiences, that is performing the specific activity; (2) verbal persuasion; (3) vicarious experience, seeing like individuals perform a specific activity, or self-modeling; and (4) physiological and affective cues such as pain, fatigue, or anxiety associated with a specific activity. Based on these sources of information, the WALC program was developed to strengthen efficacy expectations and improve behavior. Methods: An experimental pretest-posttest design with repeated measures was used.A total of 20 older adults were randomly selected from 120 eligible older adults in a retirement community and then randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group. Baseline measures (self-efficacy, outcome expectations, Short Form 12 Health Survey, falls and fall related injuries, Yale Physical Activity Survey) were done in the two week period prior to starting the intervention, and follow up testing was done at two and six months post initiation of the intervention. Results and Conclusions: A total of 17 sedentary older women with a mean age of 88+ 3.7 years were randomly assigned to receive either the WALC intervention or routine care. Ninety percent of those in the treatment group initiated and engaged in a regular exercise program during the six months of the study. There was a statistically significant difference in self-efficacy expectations, exercise behavior, and overall activity between the two groups. Those in the treatment group had stronger self-efficacy expectations related to exercise, engaged in more exercise and more free living activity, and although not statistically significant had stronger outcome expectations following exposure to the WALC intervention when compared to those who received routine care. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: The WALC intervention is a feasible intervention and can be used to help older adults initiate and adhere to an exercise program. Nurses can easily implement the WALC intervention in a variety of settings. Continued research is needed to test the intervention in a larger sample, and determine the long term effects of the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting The Impact Of The WALC Intervention On Exercise Adherence In Older Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorResnick, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Resnick, MSN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: resnick@son.umaryland.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163770-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purposes of this study were to test the feasibility of the WALC intervention (Walk, Address pain, fear, fatigue during exercise; Learn about exercise; Cue by self-modeling), and determine its effects on: (1) self-efficacy and outcome expectations; (2) exercise activity and free living activity; (3) physical and mental health status; and (4) falls and fall related injuries. Research Questions: It was hypothesized that exposure to the WALC intervention would increase self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, increase exercise and free living activity, improve physical and mental health, and decrease falls and fall related injuries. Framework: The theory of self-efficacy suggests that the stronger the individuals' efficacy expectations, the more likely they will initiate and persist with a given activity. Efficacy expectations are dynamic and are both appraised and enhanced by four mechanisms: (1) enactive mastery experiences, that is performing the specific activity; (2) verbal persuasion; (3) vicarious experience, seeing like individuals perform a specific activity, or self-modeling; and (4) physiological and affective cues such as pain, fatigue, or anxiety associated with a specific activity. Based on these sources of information, the WALC program was developed to strengthen efficacy expectations and improve behavior. Methods: An experimental pretest-posttest design with repeated measures was used.A total of 20 older adults were randomly selected from 120 eligible older adults in a retirement community and then randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group. Baseline measures (self-efficacy, outcome expectations, Short Form 12 Health Survey, falls and fall related injuries, Yale Physical Activity Survey) were done in the two week period prior to starting the intervention, and follow up testing was done at two and six months post initiation of the intervention. Results and Conclusions: A total of 17 sedentary older women with a mean age of 88+ 3.7 years were randomly assigned to receive either the WALC intervention or routine care. Ninety percent of those in the treatment group initiated and engaged in a regular exercise program during the six months of the study. There was a statistically significant difference in self-efficacy expectations, exercise behavior, and overall activity between the two groups. Those in the treatment group had stronger self-efficacy expectations related to exercise, engaged in more exercise and more free living activity, and although not statistically significant had stronger outcome expectations following exposure to the WALC intervention when compared to those who received routine care. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: The WALC intervention is a feasible intervention and can be used to help older adults initiate and adhere to an exercise program. Nurses can easily implement the WALC intervention in a variety of settings. Continued research is needed to test the intervention in a larger sample, and determine the long term effects of the intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:31Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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