2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163772
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Day-To-Day Changes In Symptom Distress In Chronic Hemodialysis Patients
Author(s):
Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte
Author Details:
Charlotte Thomas-Hawkins, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: charlot@rutgers.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine day-to-day changes in symptom distress (SD) during one week in the life of chronic hemodialysis patients. The specific aims of the study were 1) to examine within-group day-to-day changes in chronic hemodialysis patients' level of SD; 2) to assess the relationships between demographic, clinical, and SD variables, and 3) to examine the extent to which demographic and clinical variables explained variations in daily SD. The Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing and findings from the empirical literature guided this study. A correlational panel study design was used. The sample consisted of 104 chronic hemodialysis patients recruited from two outpatient dialysis centers. The Kidney Disease Quality of Life Symptom/Problem Scale (Short Form) was administered daily for seven consecutive days to examine daily SD. Day-to-day changes in SD were examined using repeated measures analysis of variance. Multiple regression was used to examine the effect of demographic and clinical variables on daily variations in SD. Study findings indicated a significant increase in the level of SD on the first and second dialysis day of the week compared to the previous and subsequent non-dialysis days. Study findings also indicated distinct intermittent and continuous patterns of SD throughout the week. Female gender, level of comorbidity, and large interdialytic fluid gains were significantly related to SD throughout the week, and these variables explained up to 17% of the variation in daily SD. In conclusion, hemodialysis patients' level of SD increases significantly on the first and second dialysis days during the week. Female gender, level of comorbidity, and large interdialytic fluid gains account for up to 17% of the variation in daily SD. These findings indicate a need for ongoing assessment of hemodialysis patients' level of SD, with particular attention given to female patients, those patients with significant comorbidity, and those patients with large interdialytic fluid gains. Moreover, there is an essential need for rigorous testing of the effect of symptom management interventions on hemodialysis patients' level of SD, particularly on dialysis days.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDay-To-Day Changes In Symptom Distress In Chronic Hemodialysis Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas-Hawkins, Charlotteen_US
dc.author.detailsCharlotte Thomas-Hawkins, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: charlot@rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163772-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine day-to-day changes in symptom distress (SD) during one week in the life of chronic hemodialysis patients. The specific aims of the study were 1) to examine within-group day-to-day changes in chronic hemodialysis patients' level of SD; 2) to assess the relationships between demographic, clinical, and SD variables, and 3) to examine the extent to which demographic and clinical variables explained variations in daily SD. The Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing and findings from the empirical literature guided this study. A correlational panel study design was used. The sample consisted of 104 chronic hemodialysis patients recruited from two outpatient dialysis centers. The Kidney Disease Quality of Life Symptom/Problem Scale (Short Form) was administered daily for seven consecutive days to examine daily SD. Day-to-day changes in SD were examined using repeated measures analysis of variance. Multiple regression was used to examine the effect of demographic and clinical variables on daily variations in SD. Study findings indicated a significant increase in the level of SD on the first and second dialysis day of the week compared to the previous and subsequent non-dialysis days. Study findings also indicated distinct intermittent and continuous patterns of SD throughout the week. Female gender, level of comorbidity, and large interdialytic fluid gains were significantly related to SD throughout the week, and these variables explained up to 17% of the variation in daily SD. In conclusion, hemodialysis patients' level of SD increases significantly on the first and second dialysis days during the week. Female gender, level of comorbidity, and large interdialytic fluid gains account for up to 17% of the variation in daily SD. These findings indicate a need for ongoing assessment of hemodialysis patients' level of SD, with particular attention given to female patients, those patients with significant comorbidity, and those patients with large interdialytic fluid gains. Moreover, there is an essential need for rigorous testing of the effect of symptom management interventions on hemodialysis patients' level of SD, particularly on dialysis days.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:34Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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