2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163773
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates Of Intimacy Among Persons With Multiple Sclerosis
Author(s):
Gulick, Elsie
Author Details:
Elsie Gulick, PhD, Professor, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: egulick@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Persons with chronic illness may experience difficulty establishing and/or maintaining intimate relationships due to absence of significant other(s), various symptoms, and functional ability. Conceptualized within Orem's self-care theory, the purpose of this study was to determine what conditioning factors (sex, living with a significant other, age, education, employment status, duration of illness) and estimative and transitional operations (Symptom Complexes: motor, brainstem, sensory, emotional/mental, elimination and ADL Functions: personal care and mobility, communication, recreation & socializing) correlated with the productive operation, intimacy, among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The sample of 153 persons diagnosed with MS was recruited from 3 local chapters of the National MS Society and one MS outpatient center. Data represent the tenth year of data collection from a longitudinal study designed to monitor health status of persons with MS. In years, subjects averaged 57.5 for age, 13.7 for education, and 21.8 since diagnosis of MS. Of the subjects, 66.7% lived with a significant other, 68% were women, and 21.6% were employed outside the home. Measures completed by subjects via mail were ADL Self-Care Scale for Persons with MS consisting of 4 subscales (Fine & Gross Motor pertaining to personal care and mobility, Sensory & Communication, Recreation & Socializing, Intimacy) and the MS-Related Symptom Scale consisting of 5 subscales (Motor, Brainstem, Sensory, Mental/Emotions, Elimination). Cronbach alphas ranged between .75 and .93 for the above subscales. Data analysis used stepwise and hierarchical multiple regression whereby the dependent variable, intimacy, was regressed on conditioning factors (Block 1), symptom complexes (Block 2), and Fine/Gross Motor, Sensory/Communication, and Recreation/Socializing (Block 3). Study findings indicated that the conditioning factors, living with a significant other was positively and current age was negatively correlated with intimacy. The estimative and transitional operations, motor symptoms and mental/emotional symptoms, were negatively correlated with intimacy. The estimative and transitional operation, recreation/socializing ADL, was positively correlated with intimacy. These 5 variables explained 37% of the variance in intimacy (F (5, 139) = 15.876, p ( .0001). Conclusion: Multiple factors influence intimate relationships among persons with MS. Positive influences included the presence of a significant other and engaging in recreation and social activities. Negative influences included the presence of symptoms such as weakness of the extremities (motor) and presence of loneliness, anxiety, and depression (mental/emotional). Older persons were less likely to report favorable intimate relationships which is related in part to the chronic progressively disabling nature of MS. Implications: An understanding of the positive and negative influences on intimate relationships among persons with MS is essential for nurses and other health care providers in meeting the diverse needs of this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates Of Intimacy Among Persons With Multiple Sclerosisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGulick, Elsieen_US
dc.author.detailsElsie Gulick, PhD, Professor, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: egulick@andromeda.rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163773-
dc.description.abstractPersons with chronic illness may experience difficulty establishing and/or maintaining intimate relationships due to absence of significant other(s), various symptoms, and functional ability. Conceptualized within Orem's self-care theory, the purpose of this study was to determine what conditioning factors (sex, living with a significant other, age, education, employment status, duration of illness) and estimative and transitional operations (Symptom Complexes: motor, brainstem, sensory, emotional/mental, elimination and ADL Functions: personal care and mobility, communication, recreation & socializing) correlated with the productive operation, intimacy, among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The sample of 153 persons diagnosed with MS was recruited from 3 local chapters of the National MS Society and one MS outpatient center. Data represent the tenth year of data collection from a longitudinal study designed to monitor health status of persons with MS. In years, subjects averaged 57.5 for age, 13.7 for education, and 21.8 since diagnosis of MS. Of the subjects, 66.7% lived with a significant other, 68% were women, and 21.6% were employed outside the home. Measures completed by subjects via mail were ADL Self-Care Scale for Persons with MS consisting of 4 subscales (Fine & Gross Motor pertaining to personal care and mobility, Sensory & Communication, Recreation & Socializing, Intimacy) and the MS-Related Symptom Scale consisting of 5 subscales (Motor, Brainstem, Sensory, Mental/Emotions, Elimination). Cronbach alphas ranged between .75 and .93 for the above subscales. Data analysis used stepwise and hierarchical multiple regression whereby the dependent variable, intimacy, was regressed on conditioning factors (Block 1), symptom complexes (Block 2), and Fine/Gross Motor, Sensory/Communication, and Recreation/Socializing (Block 3). Study findings indicated that the conditioning factors, living with a significant other was positively and current age was negatively correlated with intimacy. The estimative and transitional operations, motor symptoms and mental/emotional symptoms, were negatively correlated with intimacy. The estimative and transitional operation, recreation/socializing ADL, was positively correlated with intimacy. These 5 variables explained 37% of the variance in intimacy (F (5, 139) = 15.876, p ( .0001). Conclusion: Multiple factors influence intimate relationships among persons with MS. Positive influences included the presence of a significant other and engaging in recreation and social activities. Negative influences included the presence of symptoms such as weakness of the extremities (motor) and presence of loneliness, anxiety, and depression (mental/emotional). Older persons were less likely to report favorable intimate relationships which is related in part to the chronic progressively disabling nature of MS. Implications: An understanding of the positive and negative influences on intimate relationships among persons with MS is essential for nurses and other health care providers in meeting the diverse needs of this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:35Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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