Assessment Of Side Effects In Patients With Hepatitis C Receiving Combination Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163775
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment Of Side Effects In Patients With Hepatitis C Receiving Combination Therapy
Author(s):
Zucker, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Zucker, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.edu
Abstract:
Purpose/Objectives: To document the side effects of combination therapy (interferon alfa and ribaviron) in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Research Questions: (1) What are the reported side effects for this cohort of patients?; (2) How do these side effects compare to those reported in the literature?; (3) Is there an association between anemia or neutropenia, and somatic or psychological side effects?; (4) How many subjects stopped therapy due to adverse side effects? Framework: The middle-range theory of unpleasant symptoms has guided this study (Lenz, Suppe, Gift, Pugh & Milligan, 1995). Design: Descriptive, non-experimental. Setting: A hepatology practice in the Northeastern U.S. Sample: By random assignment, six patients received 600 mg. ribaviron/day, by mouth (Treatment Arm A) whereas the other seven patients received 1,000 mg (wt < 75 kg) or 1,200 mg (wt > 75 kg.) (Treatment Arm B). Both groups also received 3 million units, of interferon alfa that was self-administered subcutaneously three times a week. Methods: Secondary analysis of one study site. Sums, frequencies, means and standard deviations were calculated to describe the sample. Main Research Variables: Symptom assessment, chronic hepatitis C, hepatocellular carcinoma, side effects. Findings: The highest-ranking side effects were fatigue (92%), insomnia (85%), alopecia (69%) and arthralgia (62%). Mean side effects for Arm A were 9.5 and 8.6 for Arm B. Findings demonstrated concurrent decreases in WBC and HBG with increased self-report of side effects. Five of 13 did not complete the full treatment protocol, two from Arm A and three from Arm B. Two were lost to follow-up, one had an acute psychiatric crisis, one had to withdraw due to severe anemia, and one withdrew due to severe fatigue. Conclusions: Fatigue was found to be the highest-ranking reported side effect. Serologic and somatic changes are somewhat consistent with the empirical literature. A secondary analysis of the entire data set is required before confidence can be placed in the findings. Implications for Nursing Practice: A primary goal of care is to keep patients on therapy to reach a therapeutic effect. Creative strategies to prevent fatigue, arthralgia and insomnia are within the domain of nursing practice. Future research efforts will focus on interventions to prevent and minimize adverse side effects of treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment Of Side Effects In Patients With Hepatitis C Receiving Combination Therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZucker, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Zucker, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163775-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Objectives: To document the side effects of combination therapy (interferon alfa and ribaviron) in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Research Questions: (1) What are the reported side effects for this cohort of patients?; (2) How do these side effects compare to those reported in the literature?; (3) Is there an association between anemia or neutropenia, and somatic or psychological side effects?; (4) How many subjects stopped therapy due to adverse side effects? Framework: The middle-range theory of unpleasant symptoms has guided this study (Lenz, Suppe, Gift, Pugh & Milligan, 1995). Design: Descriptive, non-experimental. Setting: A hepatology practice in the Northeastern U.S. Sample: By random assignment, six patients received 600 mg. ribaviron/day, by mouth (Treatment Arm A) whereas the other seven patients received 1,000 mg (wt < 75 kg) or 1,200 mg (wt > 75 kg.) (Treatment Arm B). Both groups also received 3 million units, of interferon alfa that was self-administered subcutaneously three times a week. Methods: Secondary analysis of one study site. Sums, frequencies, means and standard deviations were calculated to describe the sample. Main Research Variables: Symptom assessment, chronic hepatitis C, hepatocellular carcinoma, side effects. Findings: The highest-ranking side effects were fatigue (92%), insomnia (85%), alopecia (69%) and arthralgia (62%). Mean side effects for Arm A were 9.5 and 8.6 for Arm B. Findings demonstrated concurrent decreases in WBC and HBG with increased self-report of side effects. Five of 13 did not complete the full treatment protocol, two from Arm A and three from Arm B. Two were lost to follow-up, one had an acute psychiatric crisis, one had to withdraw due to severe anemia, and one withdrew due to severe fatigue. Conclusions: Fatigue was found to be the highest-ranking reported side effect. Serologic and somatic changes are somewhat consistent with the empirical literature. A secondary analysis of the entire data set is required before confidence can be placed in the findings. Implications for Nursing Practice: A primary goal of care is to keep patients on therapy to reach a therapeutic effect. Creative strategies to prevent fatigue, arthralgia and insomnia are within the domain of nursing practice. Future research efforts will focus on interventions to prevent and minimize adverse side effects of treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:37Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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