Comparison Of Acupressure Bands And Droperidol For Reducing Postoperative Nausea And Vomiting (PONV) In Gynecological Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163778
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison Of Acupressure Bands And Droperidol For Reducing Postoperative Nausea And Vomiting (PONV) In Gynecological Patients
Author(s):
Schultz, Alyce
Author Details:
Alyce Schultz, PhD, Nurse Researcher, Maine Medical Center, Department of Nursing/Patient Services, Portland, Maine, USA, email: schula@mmc.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of droperidol, acupressure bands and a combination of droperidol and acupressure bands on reducing PONV in gynecological patients when administered preoperatively. Hypothesis: 35% of the patients who receive acupressure bands (Seabands, SB) or the study drug (droperidol, SD) alone will experience PONV as compared to only 15% who receive combined therapies. Framework: This study is based on multiple sites of action for reducing PONV. The antiemetic effect of acupressure bands is based on the theory of acupuncture. Elastic bands with a plastic button, placed on both wrists, exert constant pressure on the Neiguan (P6) acupuncture point. Droperidol, acting within the CNS, has shown a postoperative antiemetic effect when given 30-60 minutes preoperatively. Methodology: Using an experimental design, 150 patients were randomized to one of four groups (SD/AB; SD/placebo bands, PB); PD/SB; PD/PB). Care providers were blinded to the study group. Nausea was self-reported on a 4-point scale, vomiting was measured by the number of episodes of vomiting or retching within a 5 minute period, and pain was self-reported on an 11 point scale. Data were collected by staff nurses during the hospital stay and subjects maintained a diary after discharge. Results and Conclusions: 103 subjects completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 groups in mean age, type of surgical procedure, or number of days the acupressure bands were in place. More subjects in the SD/SB group had abdominal hysterectomies than did subjects in the other groups. The number of subjects in the SD/SB group experiencing nausea on the day of surgery approached significance (p = .056). Significantly more subjects in this group received antiemetics on the day of surgery (p = .026). Although pain scores over time were consistently higher in the SD/SB group, there were no statistical differences. Findings do not support the effectiveness of acupressure bands in reducing PONV in gynecological patients. Although few subjects actually vomited, more than 50% of the participants experienced nausea on the day of surgery. Implications for Practice: Results of the study are disappointing and are not supportive of other studies where acupressure bands have been reported effective in reducing PONV. 72% of patients who report dissatisfaction with their surgical experiences are willing to exchange pain and increased cost to avoid PONV. In a baseline review of 31 patients, 84% were nauseated at some time postoperatively. In this study, 71% of the patients were nauseated at some time postoperatively. Other interventions for relieving PONV need to be explored. Patients who experienced none or mild PONV reported support for the acupressure bands. This support did not differ for those who received the actual bands when compared to those who received the placebo bands. Further exploration of this serendipitous finding is suggested.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison Of Acupressure Bands And Droperidol For Reducing Postoperative Nausea And Vomiting (PONV) In Gynecological Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Alyceen_US
dc.author.detailsAlyce Schultz, PhD, Nurse Researcher, Maine Medical Center, Department of Nursing/Patient Services, Portland, Maine, USA, email: schula@mmc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163778-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To compare the effectiveness of droperidol, acupressure bands and a combination of droperidol and acupressure bands on reducing PONV in gynecological patients when administered preoperatively. Hypothesis: 35% of the patients who receive acupressure bands (Seabands, SB) or the study drug (droperidol, SD) alone will experience PONV as compared to only 15% who receive combined therapies. Framework: This study is based on multiple sites of action for reducing PONV. The antiemetic effect of acupressure bands is based on the theory of acupuncture. Elastic bands with a plastic button, placed on both wrists, exert constant pressure on the Neiguan (P6) acupuncture point. Droperidol, acting within the CNS, has shown a postoperative antiemetic effect when given 30-60 minutes preoperatively. Methodology: Using an experimental design, 150 patients were randomized to one of four groups (SD/AB; SD/placebo bands, PB); PD/SB; PD/PB). Care providers were blinded to the study group. Nausea was self-reported on a 4-point scale, vomiting was measured by the number of episodes of vomiting or retching within a 5 minute period, and pain was self-reported on an 11 point scale. Data were collected by staff nurses during the hospital stay and subjects maintained a diary after discharge. Results and Conclusions: 103 subjects completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 groups in mean age, type of surgical procedure, or number of days the acupressure bands were in place. More subjects in the SD/SB group had abdominal hysterectomies than did subjects in the other groups. The number of subjects in the SD/SB group experiencing nausea on the day of surgery approached significance (p = .056). Significantly more subjects in this group received antiemetics on the day of surgery (p = .026). Although pain scores over time were consistently higher in the SD/SB group, there were no statistical differences. Findings do not support the effectiveness of acupressure bands in reducing PONV in gynecological patients. Although few subjects actually vomited, more than 50% of the participants experienced nausea on the day of surgery. Implications for Practice: Results of the study are disappointing and are not supportive of other studies where acupressure bands have been reported effective in reducing PONV. 72% of patients who report dissatisfaction with their surgical experiences are willing to exchange pain and increased cost to avoid PONV. In a baseline review of 31 patients, 84% were nauseated at some time postoperatively. In this study, 71% of the patients were nauseated at some time postoperatively. Other interventions for relieving PONV need to be explored. Patients who experienced none or mild PONV reported support for the acupressure bands. This support did not differ for those who received the actual bands when compared to those who received the placebo bands. Further exploration of this serendipitous finding is suggested.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:40Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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