Definition, Measurement, Theoretical Basis, And Relationships Associated With Self-Care Self-Efficacy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163779
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Definition, Measurement, Theoretical Basis, And Relationships Associated With Self-Care Self-Efficacy
Author(s):
Froman, Robin
Author Details:
Robin Froman, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch, School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: rdfroman@utmb.edu
Abstract:
A growing body of research has focused on personal beliefs about exercising control over behaviors that affect one's life. This research demonstrates that self-efficacy provides a link between psychosocial factors and outcomes such as quality of life, moods, symptoms, and stress. Stress may be mediated by adequate coping responses, thought to have beneficial health effects. A sense of personal agency may buffer negative health effects of stress. Bandura (1997) asserts that stress reduction effects are explained more by perceived self-efficacy than by direct behavioral reduction of stress. Although the threatening event may still be present, a threat is transformed subjectively to a less aversive event when the perception of control occurs. Cancer patients who exhibit self-care self-efficacy are those who have a repertoire of self-care strategies and confidence in their ability to use such strategies to cope with the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Cancer patients' confidence in their ability to engage in self-care strategies was consistent with Bandura's (1997) self-efficacy theory and Orem's (1995) self-care theory. Self-care self-efficacy is defined as a person's confidence in being able to perform relevant self-care behaviors in a particular situation. Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH) is a 29-item self-report instrument used to measure self-care self-efficacy. Initial exploratory factor analysis of the SUPPH revealed four factors: coping, stress reduction, making decisions, and enjoying life (Lev & Owen, 1996). Since the introduction of the SUPPH, evidence has accumulated suggesting links between patients' self-care self-efficacy and outcome indicators of patient's treatment for chronic illnesses as well as family caregivers' outcomes. The discussant will provide an initial overview of self-efficacy theory and its importance in understanding performance and perseverance. This presentation will describe (1) Successful confirmatory factor analysis of the SUPPH; links between self-care self-efficacy in (2) patients after diagnosis of stroke, (3) women who are HIV+, (4) family caregivers of cancer patients. Finally, following the paper presentations the discussant will (5) critique the presenters' use of data, analysis, findings and suggestions for applications in relation to Bandura's theory of self-efficacy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDefinition, Measurement, Theoretical Basis, And Relationships Associated With Self-Care Self-Efficacyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFroman, Robinen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Froman, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch, School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: rdfroman@utmb.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163779-
dc.description.abstractA growing body of research has focused on personal beliefs about exercising control over behaviors that affect one's life. This research demonstrates that self-efficacy provides a link between psychosocial factors and outcomes such as quality of life, moods, symptoms, and stress. Stress may be mediated by adequate coping responses, thought to have beneficial health effects. A sense of personal agency may buffer negative health effects of stress. Bandura (1997) asserts that stress reduction effects are explained more by perceived self-efficacy than by direct behavioral reduction of stress. Although the threatening event may still be present, a threat is transformed subjectively to a less aversive event when the perception of control occurs. Cancer patients who exhibit self-care self-efficacy are those who have a repertoire of self-care strategies and confidence in their ability to use such strategies to cope with the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Cancer patients' confidence in their ability to engage in self-care strategies was consistent with Bandura's (1997) self-efficacy theory and Orem's (1995) self-care theory. Self-care self-efficacy is defined as a person's confidence in being able to perform relevant self-care behaviors in a particular situation. Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH) is a 29-item self-report instrument used to measure self-care self-efficacy. Initial exploratory factor analysis of the SUPPH revealed four factors: coping, stress reduction, making decisions, and enjoying life (Lev & Owen, 1996). Since the introduction of the SUPPH, evidence has accumulated suggesting links between patients' self-care self-efficacy and outcome indicators of patient's treatment for chronic illnesses as well as family caregivers' outcomes. The discussant will provide an initial overview of self-efficacy theory and its importance in understanding performance and perseverance. This presentation will describe (1) Successful confirmatory factor analysis of the SUPPH; links between self-care self-efficacy in (2) patients after diagnosis of stroke, (3) women who are HIV+, (4) family caregivers of cancer patients. Finally, following the paper presentations the discussant will (5) critique the presenters' use of data, analysis, findings and suggestions for applications in relation to Bandura's theory of self-efficacy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:41Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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