2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163781
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Care Self-Efficacy, Quality Of Life, And Depression After Stroke
Author(s):
Robinson-Smith, Gale
Author Details:
Gale Robinson-Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gale.robinson-smith@villanova.edu
Abstract:
Background: There is a growing interest in poststroke care as a means of identifying compensatory mechanisms that could lead to improved function beyond the expected neural recovery. Compensatory mechanisms to improve poststroke recovery include psychologic adaptations such as self-care self-efficacy. Bandura's social-cognitive framework was employed to understand perceived self-efficacy judgements about one's capabilities in a specific situation. Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive, longitudinal study was to describe the relationship of self-care self-efficacy to quality of life and depression at 1 and 6 months after stroke. Functional independence, because it is a major measure of objective outcome after stroke and may affect other more subjective outcomes, was examined for its relationship to the above variables. Methods: Data were obtained from an investigation of 63 patients who completed research instruments at 1 and 6 months poststroke. Measures included Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH), Quality of Life Index-Stroke Version (QLI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD), and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Pearson correlations were used to analyze bivariate relationships. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to examine more complex relationships, such as the degree to which functional independence might confound or explain the apparent effects of self-care self-efficacy. Results and Conclusions: Self-care self efficacy increased after stroke and was strongly correlated with quality of life measures and depression at both 1 and 6 months after stroke. Subjects who reported greater self-care self-efficacy were less depressed at 1 and 6 months poststroke. The correlation of the overall SUPPH score was -.61 (p=.001) at 1-month and -.67 (p=.001) at 6 months poststroke. Scores on the SUPPH and QLI increased at 6-months, indicating improved self-care self-efficacy and quality of life over time. Scores on the CES-D decreased, indicating that depression had lessened over time. Functional independence was modestly correlated with quality of life at 6 months after stroke, but not at 1 month after stroke. Nurses and family may encourage stroke patients' self-confidence, expectations for self-care, and self-efficacy behaviors, thereby improving patients' quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Care Self-Efficacy, Quality Of Life, And Depression After Strokeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobinson-Smith, Galeen_US
dc.author.detailsGale Robinson-Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gale.robinson-smith@villanova.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163781-
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is a growing interest in poststroke care as a means of identifying compensatory mechanisms that could lead to improved function beyond the expected neural recovery. Compensatory mechanisms to improve poststroke recovery include psychologic adaptations such as self-care self-efficacy. Bandura's social-cognitive framework was employed to understand perceived self-efficacy judgements about one's capabilities in a specific situation. Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive, longitudinal study was to describe the relationship of self-care self-efficacy to quality of life and depression at 1 and 6 months after stroke. Functional independence, because it is a major measure of objective outcome after stroke and may affect other more subjective outcomes, was examined for its relationship to the above variables. Methods: Data were obtained from an investigation of 63 patients who completed research instruments at 1 and 6 months poststroke. Measures included Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH), Quality of Life Index-Stroke Version (QLI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD), and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Pearson correlations were used to analyze bivariate relationships. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to examine more complex relationships, such as the degree to which functional independence might confound or explain the apparent effects of self-care self-efficacy. Results and Conclusions: Self-care self efficacy increased after stroke and was strongly correlated with quality of life measures and depression at both 1 and 6 months after stroke. Subjects who reported greater self-care self-efficacy were less depressed at 1 and 6 months poststroke. The correlation of the overall SUPPH score was -.61 (p=.001) at 1-month and -.67 (p=.001) at 6 months poststroke. Scores on the SUPPH and QLI increased at 6-months, indicating improved self-care self-efficacy and quality of life over time. Scores on the CES-D decreased, indicating that depression had lessened over time. Functional independence was modestly correlated with quality of life at 6 months after stroke, but not at 1 month after stroke. Nurses and family may encourage stroke patients' self-confidence, expectations for self-care, and self-efficacy behaviors, thereby improving patients' quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:43Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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