Relationship Of Self-Efficacy, Social Support And Quality Of Life In Women With HIV Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163782
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship Of Self-Efficacy, Social Support And Quality Of Life In Women With HIV Disease
Author(s):
Hamilton, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Hamilton, Professor, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, School of Nursing, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA, email: hamilton@falcon.tamucc.edu
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: As the number of women with HIV disease increases, understanding how HIV positive women adapt psychologically and socially has acquired a new importance. Increased self-efficacy has been associated with increased adherence to treatment, increased self-care behaviors, and decreased physical and psychological symptoms. Although self-efficacy behaviors have been studied extensively in HIV prevention, few studies have examined this concept in relationship to symptom management and adherence to treatment. Additionally, increased social support has been associated with less depressive symptoms among infected gay men and social support has been found to attenuate depressive symptomatology associated with AIDS infection. The psychosocial response of women to HIV infection may have implications for disease progression, survival and quality of life. In contrast to males with HIV who have been studied extensively, little is known about the range of adaptive and maladaptive psychosocial responses of women living with HIV infection. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the relationships of self-efficacy, social support, quality of life and perception of overall health in women with HIV disease. DESIGN: A descriptive correlation design was used to examine and quantify the relationships among the variables. SAMPLE: A convenience sample of 61 women with HIV Disease were enrolled in this study. Of these, 77.0% were African-American, 9.8% were Latino, 9.8% were white, 1.6% were American Indian/Alaska Native, and 1.6% classified themselves as other. METHODS: Study variables included: social support; self-efficacy; quality of life; and overall health perception. The predictor variables were assessed by a sociodemographic questionnaire; the Strategies Used by Patients to Promote Health instrument (self-efficacy), the Sickness Impact Profile (quality of life), and the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (social support). The outcome variable (overall health perception) was measured by self-report on one item of the sociodemographic questionnaire. FINDINGS: Using multiple regression, the optimally weighted combination of predictors explained 25.5% of the variance in the outcome variable. Ethnicity accounted for 11.4% of this explained variance. Social support and quality of life had a direct effect on overall health perception. Self-efficacy had an indirect impact on overall health perception via social support. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Innovative interventions aimed at fostering self-efficacy and social support may improve overall perception of health in this population of women with HIV disease.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship Of Self-Efficacy, Social Support And Quality Of Life In Women With HIV Diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Hamilton, Professor, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, School of Nursing, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA, email: hamilton@falcon.tamucc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163782-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: As the number of women with HIV disease increases, understanding how HIV positive women adapt psychologically and socially has acquired a new importance. Increased self-efficacy has been associated with increased adherence to treatment, increased self-care behaviors, and decreased physical and psychological symptoms. Although self-efficacy behaviors have been studied extensively in HIV prevention, few studies have examined this concept in relationship to symptom management and adherence to treatment. Additionally, increased social support has been associated with less depressive symptoms among infected gay men and social support has been found to attenuate depressive symptomatology associated with AIDS infection. The psychosocial response of women to HIV infection may have implications for disease progression, survival and quality of life. In contrast to males with HIV who have been studied extensively, little is known about the range of adaptive and maladaptive psychosocial responses of women living with HIV infection. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the relationships of self-efficacy, social support, quality of life and perception of overall health in women with HIV disease. DESIGN: A descriptive correlation design was used to examine and quantify the relationships among the variables. SAMPLE: A convenience sample of 61 women with HIV Disease were enrolled in this study. Of these, 77.0% were African-American, 9.8% were Latino, 9.8% were white, 1.6% were American Indian/Alaska Native, and 1.6% classified themselves as other. METHODS: Study variables included: social support; self-efficacy; quality of life; and overall health perception. The predictor variables were assessed by a sociodemographic questionnaire; the Strategies Used by Patients to Promote Health instrument (self-efficacy), the Sickness Impact Profile (quality of life), and the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (social support). The outcome variable (overall health perception) was measured by self-report on one item of the sociodemographic questionnaire. FINDINGS: Using multiple regression, the optimally weighted combination of predictors explained 25.5% of the variance in the outcome variable. Ethnicity accounted for 11.4% of this explained variance. Social support and quality of life had a direct effect on overall health perception. Self-efficacy had an indirect impact on overall health perception via social support. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Innovative interventions aimed at fostering self-efficacy and social support may improve overall perception of health in this population of women with HIV disease.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:44Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.