Alcohol Misuse/Abuse Among Older Women: Comparison Of Self Report And Physical Data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163786
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Alcohol Misuse/Abuse Among Older Women: Comparison Of Self Report And Physical Data
Author(s):
Stevenson, Joanne S.
Author Details:
Joanne Stevenson, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: stevenson@nightingale.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this descriptive ex-post facto study was to determine the relative predictive ability of self-report items, physical measures, and biomarkers to detect alcohol misuse and abuse among older women. Older women volunteers, who fit entry criteria, were invited to participate. From epidemiological studies, about 13% of such women are abusing or dependent on alcohol, but their chances of both diagnosis and treatment of this problem in either acute or primary care settings is about 1 in 64. Studies have shown that clinicians do not do adequate alcohol histories on older women because of ageism, stereotyping, fear of embarrassment, or lack of knowledge about the biology of aging. The 135 women subjects ranged from consuming 90 standard drinks per month (D) on average to total abstinence (ND) over their lifetime. When grouped, the mean ages did not differ by drinking history: 69.2 (ND) and 69.6 (D). Based on logistic regression, the most significant measure of alcohol abuse was a score > 0 on the T-ACE, a 4 item instrument of high risk drinking; higher tolerance was the defining item. Other significant predictors were (1) behaviors - use alcohol to sleep, high use of over-the counter drugs; (2) biomarkers -- higher Hgb, MCV, GGT, and HDL cholesterol; and (3) physical stigmata -- broken blood vessels in nose and cheeks, palmer erythema, and significantly larger liver spans. Non-discriminators included carbohydrate deficient-transferrin (CDT), total and LDL cholesterol levels, blood pressure, EKG, education and marital status. Contrary to prevailing myth, women drinkers were forthcoming about the frequency and quantity of alcohol intake, although the heaviest drinkers probably under-reported quantity per episode. A score above zero on the T-ACE best discriminated between light and heavy drinkers. Other significant correlates of heavy drinking were regular use of over-the-counter drugs, using alcohol to sleep at night, less time required to fall asleep, and a history of smoking and caffeine use. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was the best biomarker, while broken blood vessels in the nose and cheeks, palmer erythema, and liver span above 7cm were the best physical indicators. Outcomes included a comprehensive history and physical examination guide that (1) elicits specifics about alcohol and drug use, (2) tests for alcohol-related physical stigmata and pathological changes, and (3) discriminating blood tests. Older women drinkers will reveal their drinking patterns if queried objectively and with specificity. Their responses can then be verified with simple diagnostic indicators and referrals then can be made.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAlcohol Misuse/Abuse Among Older Women: Comparison Of Self Report And Physical Dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Joanne S.en_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Stevenson, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: stevenson@nightingale.rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163786-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this descriptive ex-post facto study was to determine the relative predictive ability of self-report items, physical measures, and biomarkers to detect alcohol misuse and abuse among older women. Older women volunteers, who fit entry criteria, were invited to participate. From epidemiological studies, about 13% of such women are abusing or dependent on alcohol, but their chances of both diagnosis and treatment of this problem in either acute or primary care settings is about 1 in 64. Studies have shown that clinicians do not do adequate alcohol histories on older women because of ageism, stereotyping, fear of embarrassment, or lack of knowledge about the biology of aging. The 135 women subjects ranged from consuming 90 standard drinks per month (D) on average to total abstinence (ND) over their lifetime. When grouped, the mean ages did not differ by drinking history: 69.2 (ND) and 69.6 (D). Based on logistic regression, the most significant measure of alcohol abuse was a score > 0 on the T-ACE, a 4 item instrument of high risk drinking; higher tolerance was the defining item. Other significant predictors were (1) behaviors - use alcohol to sleep, high use of over-the counter drugs; (2) biomarkers -- higher Hgb, MCV, GGT, and HDL cholesterol; and (3) physical stigmata -- broken blood vessels in nose and cheeks, palmer erythema, and significantly larger liver spans. Non-discriminators included carbohydrate deficient-transferrin (CDT), total and LDL cholesterol levels, blood pressure, EKG, education and marital status. Contrary to prevailing myth, women drinkers were forthcoming about the frequency and quantity of alcohol intake, although the heaviest drinkers probably under-reported quantity per episode. A score above zero on the T-ACE best discriminated between light and heavy drinkers. Other significant correlates of heavy drinking were regular use of over-the-counter drugs, using alcohol to sleep at night, less time required to fall asleep, and a history of smoking and caffeine use. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was the best biomarker, while broken blood vessels in the nose and cheeks, palmer erythema, and liver span above 7cm were the best physical indicators. Outcomes included a comprehensive history and physical examination guide that (1) elicits specifics about alcohol and drug use, (2) tests for alcohol-related physical stigmata and pathological changes, and (3) discriminating blood tests. Older women drinkers will reveal their drinking patterns if queried objectively and with specificity. Their responses can then be verified with simple diagnostic indicators and referrals then can be made.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:48Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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