2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163787
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Meaning Of Home: An Interpretive Phenomenological Study
Author(s):
Molony, Sheila
Author Details:
Sheila L. Molony, PhD, RN, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.molony@yale.edu
Abstract:
Background: It is estimated that 19.8% of persons over age 85 will live in a nursing home and this is the fastest growing cohort of aged individuals (Administration on Aging, 1999). In 1997, 1.6 million people resided in a nursing home (Gabrel, 2000). For many of these elders, the nursing home is "home" for life. In hospice facilities, a homelike atmosphere, warmth and comfort are deemed desirable for those coming to terms with the end of a life. Should not this same warm, comfortable, homelike atmosphere be sought for those living in a nursing home? What characteristics make an environment "homelike?" What is the meaning of "home?" Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the meaning of home for older adults. The qualities of home illuminated by this research will provide a vision for nursing home environments that promote quality of life. Method: This study used Van Manen's (1990) method of researching lived experience to explore the meaning of home for a group of older adults. The research incorporated the descriptions of home shared by seven adults ranging in age from 68 to 85. The participants lived in private dwellings or congregate housing. Other sources of data such as art, literature, poetry, phenomenological literature, personal experience and etymology were also mined for existential meaning as outlined by Van Manen. The data were examined in a process of hermeneutic phenomenologic reflection to foster deeper understanding. The findings were presented both descriptively, with supportive quotes and interpretive statements, as well as artistically, using a fictional account of the musings of an older woman as she recounts her personal experience of home. Findings: The fictional narrative described above begins the presentation of study findings. The work revealed that home is a place of ultimate separation (privacy, uniqueness, personal freedom) and ultimate connection (to our past memories, our hopes and dreams, our loved others, our true selves). Home is a vibrant, radiant existential whole. Home is an experience, a feeling, and an atmosphere. Home is a lived space of dynamic transaction. It stores life energy and meaning and recycles that energy and meaning to empower and sustain and inspire. Home encompasses physical, spiritual and social lifeworlds. It is an experience of warmth, familiarity and belonging. It is a space made better by special things (meaningful possessions) and special people or pets (loved others). Implications for Nursing: The vision of home presented in this study may be used for instrument development (a tool to measure one's sense of being "at home") or as an inspiration for organizational change. Further research is needed to determine whether the "milieu" of home can be brought to the nursing home environment and to discover the relationship between "at-home-ness" and quality of life, satisfaction and depression.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Meaning Of Home: An Interpretive Phenomenological Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolony, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsSheila L. Molony, PhD, RN, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.molony@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163787-
dc.description.abstractBackground: It is estimated that 19.8% of persons over age 85 will live in a nursing home and this is the fastest growing cohort of aged individuals (Administration on Aging, 1999). In 1997, 1.6 million people resided in a nursing home (Gabrel, 2000). For many of these elders, the nursing home is "home" for life. In hospice facilities, a homelike atmosphere, warmth and comfort are deemed desirable for those coming to terms with the end of a life. Should not this same warm, comfortable, homelike atmosphere be sought for those living in a nursing home? What characteristics make an environment "homelike?" What is the meaning of "home?" Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the meaning of home for older adults. The qualities of home illuminated by this research will provide a vision for nursing home environments that promote quality of life. Method: This study used Van Manen's (1990) method of researching lived experience to explore the meaning of home for a group of older adults. The research incorporated the descriptions of home shared by seven adults ranging in age from 68 to 85. The participants lived in private dwellings or congregate housing. Other sources of data such as art, literature, poetry, phenomenological literature, personal experience and etymology were also mined for existential meaning as outlined by Van Manen. The data were examined in a process of hermeneutic phenomenologic reflection to foster deeper understanding. The findings were presented both descriptively, with supportive quotes and interpretive statements, as well as artistically, using a fictional account of the musings of an older woman as she recounts her personal experience of home. Findings: The fictional narrative described above begins the presentation of study findings. The work revealed that home is a place of ultimate separation (privacy, uniqueness, personal freedom) and ultimate connection (to our past memories, our hopes and dreams, our loved others, our true selves). Home is a vibrant, radiant existential whole. Home is an experience, a feeling, and an atmosphere. Home is a lived space of dynamic transaction. It stores life energy and meaning and recycles that energy and meaning to empower and sustain and inspire. Home encompasses physical, spiritual and social lifeworlds. It is an experience of warmth, familiarity and belonging. It is a space made better by special things (meaningful possessions) and special people or pets (loved others). Implications for Nursing: The vision of home presented in this study may be used for instrument development (a tool to measure one's sense of being "at home") or as an inspiration for organizational change. Further research is needed to determine whether the "milieu" of home can be brought to the nursing home environment and to discover the relationship between "at-home-ness" and quality of life, satisfaction and depression.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:49Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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