2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163791
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bone Density Testing And Osteoporosis Risk Factors In Women With Disabilities
Author(s):
Smeltzer, Suzanne
Author Details:
Suzanne Smeltzer, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: suzanne.smeltzer@villanova.edu
Abstract:
Many women with disabilities are likely to be at risk for osteoporosis because of their inability to engage in weight bearing exercise, use of medications to treat their disorders, and a low calcium intake that is common in many women. Their risks increase with menopause. Despite these risks, few women with disabilities undergo bone mineral density (BMD) testing. This study examined the risks for osteoporosis and the results of BMD screening in 250 women with a variety of disabilities. Women who participated in one of three workshops or health fairs for women with disabilities underwent peripheral BMD screening at the calcaneus. Subjects completed a short questionnaire about risks for osteoporosis (e.g., Caucasian, menopausal, thin frame, history of broken bone, low calcium intake, lack of regular exercise, etc.) and about strategies they use to prevent osteoporosis. Subjects were also asked if they ever had BMD testing before and if testing had ever been recommended to them. The predominantly Caucasian sample ranged in age from 20 to 84 with a mean of 49.5 years. Disabilities reported included MS, spina bifida, post polio syndrome, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy and other neurological and non-neurological disabling conditions. BMD test results, reported as t scores, ranged from 3.5 to - 5.0. When t scores were categorized using WHO standards, 43.6% of the women were categorized as having normal bone mineral density, 28.4% had osteopenia, and 28% had osteoporosis. The number of risk factors ranged from none to 10, with a mean of 4.6. Despite number of risk factors for osteoporosis in this group of women, only 32% of them reported taking calcium supplements, 16% reported use of hormone replacement therapy, and 7.2 % reported use of other medications to prevent or reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Only 20% reported previous BMD testing and 29% reported ever receiving a recommendation for testing from a health care provider. These findings suggest the need for health promotion in women with disabilities and greater attention to detection, prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis. Further, these findings suggest that reimbursement for bone mineral density testing in this high-risk group of women be examined to assure that the cost of testing is not a major barrier to women at high risk for osteoporosis because of their disability.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBone Density Testing And Osteoporosis Risk Factors In Women With Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmeltzer, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Smeltzer, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: suzanne.smeltzer@villanova.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163791-
dc.description.abstractMany women with disabilities are likely to be at risk for osteoporosis because of their inability to engage in weight bearing exercise, use of medications to treat their disorders, and a low calcium intake that is common in many women. Their risks increase with menopause. Despite these risks, few women with disabilities undergo bone mineral density (BMD) testing. This study examined the risks for osteoporosis and the results of BMD screening in 250 women with a variety of disabilities. Women who participated in one of three workshops or health fairs for women with disabilities underwent peripheral BMD screening at the calcaneus. Subjects completed a short questionnaire about risks for osteoporosis (e.g., Caucasian, menopausal, thin frame, history of broken bone, low calcium intake, lack of regular exercise, etc.) and about strategies they use to prevent osteoporosis. Subjects were also asked if they ever had BMD testing before and if testing had ever been recommended to them. The predominantly Caucasian sample ranged in age from 20 to 84 with a mean of 49.5 years. Disabilities reported included MS, spina bifida, post polio syndrome, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy and other neurological and non-neurological disabling conditions. BMD test results, reported as t scores, ranged from 3.5 to - 5.0. When t scores were categorized using WHO standards, 43.6% of the women were categorized as having normal bone mineral density, 28.4% had osteopenia, and 28% had osteoporosis. The number of risk factors ranged from none to 10, with a mean of 4.6. Despite number of risk factors for osteoporosis in this group of women, only 32% of them reported taking calcium supplements, 16% reported use of hormone replacement therapy, and 7.2 % reported use of other medications to prevent or reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Only 20% reported previous BMD testing and 29% reported ever receiving a recommendation for testing from a health care provider. These findings suggest the need for health promotion in women with disabilities and greater attention to detection, prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis. Further, these findings suggest that reimbursement for bone mineral density testing in this high-risk group of women be examined to assure that the cost of testing is not a major barrier to women at high risk for osteoporosis because of their disability.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:53Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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