2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163795
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect Of Caffeine Reduction On Sleep And Well-Being In Persons With HIV
Author(s):
Dreher, Heyward
Author Details:
Heyward Dreher, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Assistant Professor, MCP Hahnemann University, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: michael.dreher@drexel.edu
Abstract:
Sleep pattern disturbances in persons with HIV have been reported to be as high as 73%, far exceeding the proportion found in healthy populations. The purpose of this study was to test whether there were any differences in sleep and well-being between a group of persons with HIV who reduced their caffeine intake by 90% or greater for 30 days (n = 44) versus a group of persons with HIV who continued their usual caffeine consumption (n = 44). The study used Orem's Self-care Framework as a conceptual framework and Orem's Theory of Self-care as the theoretical framework. Out of this theoretical framework, a secondary hypothesis that well being was an outcome of self-care was also tested. An international sample of 88 HIV+ subjects were recruited from print sources and the Internet. Each subject reported significant sleeping difficulties (mean pre-PSQI score = 11.06), taking antiretroviral medication, and consuming caffeine daily (mean mg/caffeine/day = 476). Subjects were administered pre- and post-test Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Perceived Well-being Scale-Revised (PWB-R), and MOS-HIV Health Survey instruments. Health status (MOS-HIV summary scores) was used as a covariate. Results indicated there was a significant difference between the two groups on MANCOVA analysis for sleep (PSQI) (F (1; 86) = 14.032, p < .001), identifying a 35% improvement in sleep among experimental group subjects. There was no significant difference between the two groups for well-being (PWB-R) (F (1; 86) = .111, p = .739). Post-hoc analysis on repeated measures ANCOVA indicated there was a significant interaction effect over time for well-being (PWB-R) between the two groups (F = 6.526, p = .012), resulting in a 7% improvement in well-being for experimental group subjects. Caffeine self-regulation behaviors (voluntary caffeine withdrawal, voluntary caffeine reduction, and voluntary caffeine abstinence) were identified as self-care interventions for persons living with HIV, with 78.2% of subjects indicating caffeine self-regulation was important to health. Well-being was further supported as an outcome of self-care with a reported correlation between sleep and well-being of r = -.339. Well-being was therefore posited to be an outcome of having met universal self-care requisites, providing an extension to Orem's Theory of Self-care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect Of Caffeine Reduction On Sleep And Well-Being In Persons With HIVen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDreher, Heywarden_US
dc.author.detailsHeyward Dreher, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Assistant Professor, MCP Hahnemann University, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: michael.dreher@drexel.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163795-
dc.description.abstractSleep pattern disturbances in persons with HIV have been reported to be as high as 73%, far exceeding the proportion found in healthy populations. The purpose of this study was to test whether there were any differences in sleep and well-being between a group of persons with HIV who reduced their caffeine intake by 90% or greater for 30 days (n = 44) versus a group of persons with HIV who continued their usual caffeine consumption (n = 44). The study used Orem's Self-care Framework as a conceptual framework and Orem's Theory of Self-care as the theoretical framework. Out of this theoretical framework, a secondary hypothesis that well being was an outcome of self-care was also tested. An international sample of 88 HIV+ subjects were recruited from print sources and the Internet. Each subject reported significant sleeping difficulties (mean pre-PSQI score = 11.06), taking antiretroviral medication, and consuming caffeine daily (mean mg/caffeine/day = 476). Subjects were administered pre- and post-test Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Perceived Well-being Scale-Revised (PWB-R), and MOS-HIV Health Survey instruments. Health status (MOS-HIV summary scores) was used as a covariate. Results indicated there was a significant difference between the two groups on MANCOVA analysis for sleep (PSQI) (F (1; 86) = 14.032, p < .001), identifying a 35% improvement in sleep among experimental group subjects. There was no significant difference between the two groups for well-being (PWB-R) (F (1; 86) = .111, p = .739). Post-hoc analysis on repeated measures ANCOVA indicated there was a significant interaction effect over time for well-being (PWB-R) between the two groups (F = 6.526, p = .012), resulting in a 7% improvement in well-being for experimental group subjects. Caffeine self-regulation behaviors (voluntary caffeine withdrawal, voluntary caffeine reduction, and voluntary caffeine abstinence) were identified as self-care interventions for persons living with HIV, with 78.2% of subjects indicating caffeine self-regulation was important to health. Well-being was further supported as an outcome of self-care with a reported correlation between sleep and well-being of r = -.339. Well-being was therefore posited to be an outcome of having met universal self-care requisites, providing an extension to Orem's Theory of Self-care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:13:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:13:57Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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