Coordination of Patient-Nurse Nonverbal Behavior and Communication of Relationships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163797
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coordination of Patient-Nurse Nonverbal Behavior and Communication of Relationships
Author(s):
Gilbert, Dorothy
Author Details:
Dorothy Gilbert, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: dgilbert@nursing.umass.edu
Abstract:
Purpose, framework, question: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal behavior and the communication of relationships. Positive patient-provider relationships contribute to patient satisfaction, a quality measure commonly included in current health care evaluation surveys. Positive relationships are primarily communicated via nonverbal activities such as gazing, smiling, eyebrow animation, head nodding and shaking, leaning toward the patient, maintaining a close interpersonal distance and uttering encouragers such as "mm-hmm." However, research to date has focused mainly on nurses' nonverbal activities alone. Based on a relational communication framework and prior research, the question posed in this study was: To what extent does coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal activities explain the variance in relational themes of trust/receptivity, depth/similarity/affection, composure, non-formality, non-difference and non-dominance? Methods: Participants were 126 college women who viewed brief, videotaped inter- actions between twelve nurses and a professional actress/patient. After viewing each interaction, participants completed a 30-item relational theme inventory concerning what the nurse's behavior communicated. Defining items for the six relational themes, presented above, were selected from the inventory. Only data pertaining to the twelve nurses viewed by participants as the final two interactions on the videotape were used in this study. The nonverbal activities of the nurses and the patient were noted by two observers for every 1-second time window of the interactions. Interobserver reliabilities were Cohen's Kappa (.90. Coordination of each nurse's nonverbal activities with those of the patient were measured as simultaneous coordination (the amount of variance in the nurse's activities at Time 2 explained by the patient's activities at Time 2, minus the autocorrelation of the nurse's activities at time 2 with Time 1) and lagged coordination (the amount of variance in the nurse's activities at Time 2 explained by the patient's activities at Time 1, minus the autocorrelation of the nurse's activities). Results: Repeated measures multiple regression analysis revealed that simultaneous coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal activities explained a significant amount of the variance in trust/receptivity, depth/similarity/affection, composure, non-formality, and non-difference. Lagged coordination explained a significant amount of the variance only in non-formality. Neither type of coordination was associated with non-dominance. Conclusions and implications: Simultaneous coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal activities may partly explain how positive relationships are communicated. If similar results are found in clinical settings, nurses may have an additional strategy to improve patient-nurse relationships at a time when patient satisfaction is being scrutinized in nation-wide evaluations of health care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoordination of Patient-Nurse Nonverbal Behavior and Communication of Relationshipsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Dorothyen_US
dc.author.detailsDorothy Gilbert, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: dgilbert@nursing.umass.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163797-
dc.description.abstractPurpose, framework, question: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal behavior and the communication of relationships. Positive patient-provider relationships contribute to patient satisfaction, a quality measure commonly included in current health care evaluation surveys. Positive relationships are primarily communicated via nonverbal activities such as gazing, smiling, eyebrow animation, head nodding and shaking, leaning toward the patient, maintaining a close interpersonal distance and uttering encouragers such as "mm-hmm." However, research to date has focused mainly on nurses' nonverbal activities alone. Based on a relational communication framework and prior research, the question posed in this study was: To what extent does coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal activities explain the variance in relational themes of trust/receptivity, depth/similarity/affection, composure, non-formality, non-difference and non-dominance? Methods: Participants were 126 college women who viewed brief, videotaped inter- actions between twelve nurses and a professional actress/patient. After viewing each interaction, participants completed a 30-item relational theme inventory concerning what the nurse's behavior communicated. Defining items for the six relational themes, presented above, were selected from the inventory. Only data pertaining to the twelve nurses viewed by participants as the final two interactions on the videotape were used in this study. The nonverbal activities of the nurses and the patient were noted by two observers for every 1-second time window of the interactions. Interobserver reliabilities were Cohen's Kappa (.90. Coordination of each nurse's nonverbal activities with those of the patient were measured as simultaneous coordination (the amount of variance in the nurse's activities at Time 2 explained by the patient's activities at Time 2, minus the autocorrelation of the nurse's activities at time 2 with Time 1) and lagged coordination (the amount of variance in the nurse's activities at Time 2 explained by the patient's activities at Time 1, minus the autocorrelation of the nurse's activities). Results: Repeated measures multiple regression analysis revealed that simultaneous coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal activities explained a significant amount of the variance in trust/receptivity, depth/similarity/affection, composure, non-formality, and non-difference. Lagged coordination explained a significant amount of the variance only in non-formality. Neither type of coordination was associated with non-dominance. Conclusions and implications: Simultaneous coordination of patient-nurse nonverbal activities may partly explain how positive relationships are communicated. If similar results are found in clinical settings, nurses may have an additional strategy to improve patient-nurse relationships at a time when patient satisfaction is being scrutinized in nation-wide evaluations of health care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:00Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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