A Comparison Of Organizational Attributes And Outcomes In The Original And ANCC Recognized Magnet Hospitals: CNE Reports

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163798
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison Of Organizational Attributes And Outcomes In The Original And ANCC Recognized Magnet Hospitals: CNE Reports
Author(s):
Havens, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Havens, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dhavens@psu.edu
Abstract:
This study, funded by the American Nurses Foundation, extends an earlier study of two groups of acute care hospitals - both designated as magnet hospitals: the original magnet hospitals designated through the American Academy of Nursing in 1982 and those recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) since 1995. In the first study, when compared to nurses working in the original magnet hospitals, nurses working in ANCC recognized magnet hospitals reported higher quality patient care, more autonomy and control, better RN/MD relations, better staffing levels greater satisfaction with work, and less emotional exhaustion (Aiken, Havens, & Sloane, 2000). The purpose of this current study was to explore core structural features of the organization of nursing in these same hospitals. The central question was "Are there core organizational differences in these two groups of hospitals that might explain the nurse reported differences in the clinical practice environments?" A mailed cross-sectional survey design was used. Chief nurse executives (CNEs) from the two groups of magnet hospitals served as organizational informants. The findings show that just as staff nurses reported differences in the clinical practice environments, the CNEs also reported differences (many statistically significant) in the way these two groups of hospitals are structured and how nursing departments are organized, including: the existence of a distinct functioning department of nursing, the number of hospitals overseen by the CNE, tenure of the CNE, use of agency nurses, the presence of a doctorally prepared nurse researcher to support staff nurse research and practice, CNE authority for nursing practice, degree of implementation of select restructuring strategies, and collective bargaining activity. In addition, the two groups of hospitals demonstrated differences in reported outcomes such as difficulty recruiting staff nurses, patient and family complaints during the previous year, and CNE appraisals of the quality of care. Striking group differences were also apparent in the prevalence of their recognition by hospital survey and profiling groups including selection to the U.S. News and World Reports "Best" list, HCIA's "Top 100", and commendation by JCAHO. Finally, merging the CNE and staff RN data from the same hospitals permitted the examination of correlates of organizational structure and staff nurse reports of quality and emotional exhaustion. The findings from this study become even more meaningful when one considers that while these two groups of magnet hospitals differ, there is evidence that the general hospital population varies even more from the study sample. In the midst of organizational redesign activities, "Hospital-based nursing services are at a critical juncture, facing major changes in their historical place within the hospital setting." (Clifford, 1998) The findings from this study offer research-based guidance for those in leadership roles. This information has the potential to influence patient and staff welfare, the recruitment and retention of qualified RNs, as well as providing evidenced-based ammunition for nurse leaders as reorganization strategies are designed and orchestrated.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison Of Organizational Attributes And Outcomes In The Original And ANCC Recognized Magnet Hospitals: CNE Reportsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHavens, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Havens, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dhavens@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163798-
dc.description.abstractThis study, funded by the American Nurses Foundation, extends an earlier study of two groups of acute care hospitals - both designated as magnet hospitals: the original magnet hospitals designated through the American Academy of Nursing in 1982 and those recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) since 1995. In the first study, when compared to nurses working in the original magnet hospitals, nurses working in ANCC recognized magnet hospitals reported higher quality patient care, more autonomy and control, better RN/MD relations, better staffing levels greater satisfaction with work, and less emotional exhaustion (Aiken, Havens, & Sloane, 2000). The purpose of this current study was to explore core structural features of the organization of nursing in these same hospitals. The central question was "Are there core organizational differences in these two groups of hospitals that might explain the nurse reported differences in the clinical practice environments?" A mailed cross-sectional survey design was used. Chief nurse executives (CNEs) from the two groups of magnet hospitals served as organizational informants. The findings show that just as staff nurses reported differences in the clinical practice environments, the CNEs also reported differences (many statistically significant) in the way these two groups of hospitals are structured and how nursing departments are organized, including: the existence of a distinct functioning department of nursing, the number of hospitals overseen by the CNE, tenure of the CNE, use of agency nurses, the presence of a doctorally prepared nurse researcher to support staff nurse research and practice, CNE authority for nursing practice, degree of implementation of select restructuring strategies, and collective bargaining activity. In addition, the two groups of hospitals demonstrated differences in reported outcomes such as difficulty recruiting staff nurses, patient and family complaints during the previous year, and CNE appraisals of the quality of care. Striking group differences were also apparent in the prevalence of their recognition by hospital survey and profiling groups including selection to the U.S. News and World Reports "Best" list, HCIA's "Top 100", and commendation by JCAHO. Finally, merging the CNE and staff RN data from the same hospitals permitted the examination of correlates of organizational structure and staff nurse reports of quality and emotional exhaustion. The findings from this study become even more meaningful when one considers that while these two groups of magnet hospitals differ, there is evidence that the general hospital population varies even more from the study sample. In the midst of organizational redesign activities, "Hospital-based nursing services are at a critical juncture, facing major changes in their historical place within the hospital setting." (Clifford, 1998) The findings from this study offer research-based guidance for those in leadership roles. This information has the potential to influence patient and staff welfare, the recruitment and retention of qualified RNs, as well as providing evidenced-based ammunition for nurse leaders as reorganization strategies are designed and orchestrated.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:01Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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