Ethical Issues Experienced By Psychiatric/ Mental Health And Substance Abuse Nurses: Frequency And Disturbance Levels

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163800
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethical Issues Experienced By Psychiatric/ Mental Health And Substance Abuse Nurses: Frequency And Disturbance Levels
Author(s):
Grace, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Grace, Boston College, School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: pamela.grace.2@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The overall purpose of this study was to identify appropriate ethics education content for continuing education programs designed for psychiatric/mental health (P/MH) and substance abuse (SA) RNs. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this study were to identify: (a) the ethical issues experienced by P/MH amd SA RNs, (b) how frequently the ethical issues occur in the RNs' practices, and (c) how disturbed the RNs are by the issues. Methods: Dillman's Total Design Method for mailed surveys guided the study design. Data analysis was performed on 162 usable questionnaires from New England RNs who identified psychiatric/mental health (n=145) or substance abuse (n=17) as their area of nursing practice. Descriptive statistics were used to answer the research questions. Results: The typical nurse participant in the study was a 46-year-old female with a college degree who is employed full time as a staff nurse, has 19 years of nursing experience, and has been in her present position an average of 6.7 years. The RNs most frequently experienced ethical issues during the previous 12 months were: (1) protecting patients' rights and human dignity, (2) providing care with possible risk to the nurse's health, (3) using/not using physical or chemical restraints in patient care, (4) respecting/not respecting informed consent to treatment, and (5) staffing patterns that limit patient access to nursing care. The most disturbing ethical issues selected by the RNs were: (1) staffing patterns that limit patient access to nursing care, (2) implementing managed care policies that threaten quality of care, (3) working with unethical/incompetent/impaired colleagues, (4) providing care with possible risk to the nurse's health, and (5) prolonging the living/dying process with inappropriate measures. Forty one percent (41%) of the RN participants reported that they experienced ethical issues in their practices 1-4 times per week or daily. Implications: Ethics education for P/MH and SA RNs should focus on the issues most frequently experienced and disturbing. Further research is needed to identify the influence of worksetting factors on how the issues are experienced and handled by the RNs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthical Issues Experienced By Psychiatric/ Mental Health And Substance Abuse Nurses: Frequency And Disturbance Levelsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrace, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Grace, Boston College, School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: pamela.grace.2@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163800-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The overall purpose of this study was to identify appropriate ethics education content for continuing education programs designed for psychiatric/mental health (P/MH) and substance abuse (SA) RNs. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this study were to identify: (a) the ethical issues experienced by P/MH amd SA RNs, (b) how frequently the ethical issues occur in the RNs' practices, and (c) how disturbed the RNs are by the issues. Methods: Dillman's Total Design Method for mailed surveys guided the study design. Data analysis was performed on 162 usable questionnaires from New England RNs who identified psychiatric/mental health (n=145) or substance abuse (n=17) as their area of nursing practice. Descriptive statistics were used to answer the research questions. Results: The typical nurse participant in the study was a 46-year-old female with a college degree who is employed full time as a staff nurse, has 19 years of nursing experience, and has been in her present position an average of 6.7 years. The RNs most frequently experienced ethical issues during the previous 12 months were: (1) protecting patients' rights and human dignity, (2) providing care with possible risk to the nurse's health, (3) using/not using physical or chemical restraints in patient care, (4) respecting/not respecting informed consent to treatment, and (5) staffing patterns that limit patient access to nursing care. The most disturbing ethical issues selected by the RNs were: (1) staffing patterns that limit patient access to nursing care, (2) implementing managed care policies that threaten quality of care, (3) working with unethical/incompetent/impaired colleagues, (4) providing care with possible risk to the nurse's health, and (5) prolonging the living/dying process with inappropriate measures. Forty one percent (41%) of the RN participants reported that they experienced ethical issues in their practices 1-4 times per week or daily. Implications: Ethics education for P/MH and SA RNs should focus on the issues most frequently experienced and disturbing. Further research is needed to identify the influence of worksetting factors on how the issues are experienced and handled by the RNs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:03Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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