Oxygen Saturations And Heart And Respiratory Rates Of Very Preterm Neonates During Caregiver Handling And At Rest With Special Attention To Gestational Age

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163805
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oxygen Saturations And Heart And Respiratory Rates Of Very Preterm Neonates During Caregiver Handling And At Rest With Special Attention To Gestational Age
Author(s):
Pressler, Jana
Author Details:
Jana Pressler, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jlp16@psu.edu
Abstract:
Comparing neonates' oxygen saturation (O2) levels and heart (HR) and respiratory (RR) rates during times of handling and times of rest with special emphasis on gestational age (GA) is important because caregivers need assurance that they are interacting safely with very immature neonates in the intensive care nursery (ICN). To empirically support neonates' needs for reduced stimulation and/or clustered caregiving, knowledge concerning physiologic responses during handling and rest based on GA is critical. The purpose of this study was to assess whether differences existed between these physiologic parameters during two times of caregiver handling as contrasted with two times of rest. A secondary aim was to characterize the maturational patterns of O2, HR, and RR in a group of very preterm neonates during the first two weeks postnatally. Continuous O2, HR, and RR monitoring was used to study 41 very preterm, relatively healthy neonates in an ICN that employed a clustered care approach. GAs ranged from 23 to 29 wk, with an average of 27 wk (SD = 1.64 wk). Birth weights ranged from 550 to 1480 g (M = 935 g, SD = 224 g). Neonates were classified into three GA groupings: 23-25 wk (n = 8), 26-27 wk (n = 15), and 28-29 wk (n = 18). Continuous recordings made of O2, HR, and RR during the first 14 days after birth were downloaded and analyzed. Data were collected at 10 sec intervals, with the first two minutes of each neonate's data eliminated to avoid any beginning peculiarities. For each of the dependent variables (O2, HR, and RR), four averaged scores were computed and used as dependent variables in the analyses. Repeated measures 2 X 2 X 3 ANOVAs were completed to assess the effects of handling, time, GA, and their interactions. A significant handling by GA interaction was found for O2 (F(2,36) = 6.07, p = .0054). The youngest GA group was found to have higher levels of O2 during quiet times. A significant time by GA interaction for oxygen saturation was found as well (F(2,36) = 7.71, p = .0016). Essentially, all three GA groups started out exhibiting similar O2 levels for week 1. At week 2, the youngest GA group had a decrease in O2 while the two older groups had increases in O2, with the oldest group having the greatest increase. A significant handling effect was found for HR (F (1,38) = 4.42, p = .04). HRs during quiet times (M = 148.33) were lower than HRs during handling times (M = 148.60). A significant time effect was found for HR (F(1,38) = 43.68, p = .0001). The average HR for the first week (M = 144.98) was less than the average HR for the second week (M = 151.95). There was a significant time effect for RR (F(1,38) = 7.23, p = .0106). The average RR was 53.37 for week 1 and 56.54 for week 2. There was a significant handling by time by GA interaction for RR (F(2,38) = 4.14, p = .0236). The youngest GA group was significantly different and producing this triple interaction. The results are discussed in relation to qualifying neonates' needs for minimizing stimulation based on GA groupings. In summary, certain gestational age categories remain more variable than others to stimulation and, therefore, may be more susceptible to physiologic compromise. Continuous monitoring validates neonates' developmental capabilities to cope with intermittent handling.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOxygen Saturations And Heart And Respiratory Rates Of Very Preterm Neonates During Caregiver Handling And At Rest With Special Attention To Gestational Ageen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPressler, Janaen_US
dc.author.detailsJana Pressler, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jlp16@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163805-
dc.description.abstractComparing neonates' oxygen saturation (O2) levels and heart (HR) and respiratory (RR) rates during times of handling and times of rest with special emphasis on gestational age (GA) is important because caregivers need assurance that they are interacting safely with very immature neonates in the intensive care nursery (ICN). To empirically support neonates' needs for reduced stimulation and/or clustered caregiving, knowledge concerning physiologic responses during handling and rest based on GA is critical. The purpose of this study was to assess whether differences existed between these physiologic parameters during two times of caregiver handling as contrasted with two times of rest. A secondary aim was to characterize the maturational patterns of O2, HR, and RR in a group of very preterm neonates during the first two weeks postnatally. Continuous O2, HR, and RR monitoring was used to study 41 very preterm, relatively healthy neonates in an ICN that employed a clustered care approach. GAs ranged from 23 to 29 wk, with an average of 27 wk (SD = 1.64 wk). Birth weights ranged from 550 to 1480 g (M = 935 g, SD = 224 g). Neonates were classified into three GA groupings: 23-25 wk (n = 8), 26-27 wk (n = 15), and 28-29 wk (n = 18). Continuous recordings made of O2, HR, and RR during the first 14 days after birth were downloaded and analyzed. Data were collected at 10 sec intervals, with the first two minutes of each neonate's data eliminated to avoid any beginning peculiarities. For each of the dependent variables (O2, HR, and RR), four averaged scores were computed and used as dependent variables in the analyses. Repeated measures 2 X 2 X 3 ANOVAs were completed to assess the effects of handling, time, GA, and their interactions. A significant handling by GA interaction was found for O2 (F(2,36) = 6.07, p = .0054). The youngest GA group was found to have higher levels of O2 during quiet times. A significant time by GA interaction for oxygen saturation was found as well (F(2,36) = 7.71, p = .0016). Essentially, all three GA groups started out exhibiting similar O2 levels for week 1. At week 2, the youngest GA group had a decrease in O2 while the two older groups had increases in O2, with the oldest group having the greatest increase. A significant handling effect was found for HR (F (1,38) = 4.42, p = .04). HRs during quiet times (M = 148.33) were lower than HRs during handling times (M = 148.60). A significant time effect was found for HR (F(1,38) = 43.68, p = .0001). The average HR for the first week (M = 144.98) was less than the average HR for the second week (M = 151.95). There was a significant time effect for RR (F(1,38) = 7.23, p = .0106). The average RR was 53.37 for week 1 and 56.54 for week 2. There was a significant handling by time by GA interaction for RR (F(2,38) = 4.14, p = .0236). The youngest GA group was significantly different and producing this triple interaction. The results are discussed in relation to qualifying neonates' needs for minimizing stimulation based on GA groupings. In summary, certain gestational age categories remain more variable than others to stimulation and, therefore, may be more susceptible to physiologic compromise. Continuous monitoring validates neonates' developmental capabilities to cope with intermittent handling.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:08Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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