2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163806
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Youth Empowerment Project: Effects Of An Evidence-Based Model
Author(s):
Moody, Kimberly
Author Details:
Kimberly Moody, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing & Health Professions, Portland, Maine, USA, email: kmoody@usm.maine.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program for high risk youth living in a troubled northeast inner-city neighborhood. Specific Aims: To implement a community-based substance abuse and violence prevention program aimed at increasing social support, social skills, and levels of community service among high risk youth. Problem: Youth who live in neighborhoods plagued with poverty and crime are especially at risk for problems with substance abuse and violence. These children lack essential resources for successful lives. They are typically marginalized from protective community institutions such as school, church, and family because of irregular school attendance, social skills deficits, poor family management practices, and destructive ties to deviant peers. They often lack positive social support from others and are not perceived as valuable members of the community. Framework: Research was reviewed in the areas of substance abuse and violence prevention. The most widely research-supported models were Eggert's and Nicholas' Reconnecting Youth Model, Hawkins' and Catalano's Resiliency Model, and the Developmental Asset Model created by the Search Institute. The Youth Empowerment Model (YEM) was developed from an integration of these evidence-based models to achieve four expected intervention outcomes associated with protection from substance abuse and violence among youth: 1) high levels of mentor support; 2) high levels of positive peer bonding, 3) increased competencies in social skills, and 4) active community service. Methods: Nursing faculty and student nurses partnered with community members to implement a comprehensive prevention program aimed at youth having histories of legal, social, mental health and/or school problems. Evidenced-based interventions included providing social support, mentoring, and social skills training in areas such as decision-making, mood management, and interpersonal skills. Nursing students, participants, and other key stakeholders conducted program evaluation using multiple methods and triangulation of sources. Results and Conclusions: Results indicated the program was effective in providing high levels of support from mentors and peers, effective skills in decision-making, mood management, and interpersonal communication, and higher levels of community involvement. Implications: Findings support the effectiveness of this community based prevention program for high risk youth. Continued research to study the efficacy of this multi-level intervention with other similar groups is indicated.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Youth Empowerment Project: Effects Of An Evidence-Based Modelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoody, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly Moody, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing & Health Professions, Portland, Maine, USA, email: kmoody@usm.maine.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163806-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this project was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program for high risk youth living in a troubled northeast inner-city neighborhood. Specific Aims: To implement a community-based substance abuse and violence prevention program aimed at increasing social support, social skills, and levels of community service among high risk youth. Problem: Youth who live in neighborhoods plagued with poverty and crime are especially at risk for problems with substance abuse and violence. These children lack essential resources for successful lives. They are typically marginalized from protective community institutions such as school, church, and family because of irregular school attendance, social skills deficits, poor family management practices, and destructive ties to deviant peers. They often lack positive social support from others and are not perceived as valuable members of the community. Framework: Research was reviewed in the areas of substance abuse and violence prevention. The most widely research-supported models were Eggert's and Nicholas' Reconnecting Youth Model, Hawkins' and Catalano's Resiliency Model, and the Developmental Asset Model created by the Search Institute. The Youth Empowerment Model (YEM) was developed from an integration of these evidence-based models to achieve four expected intervention outcomes associated with protection from substance abuse and violence among youth: 1) high levels of mentor support; 2) high levels of positive peer bonding, 3) increased competencies in social skills, and 4) active community service. Methods: Nursing faculty and student nurses partnered with community members to implement a comprehensive prevention program aimed at youth having histories of legal, social, mental health and/or school problems. Evidenced-based interventions included providing social support, mentoring, and social skills training in areas such as decision-making, mood management, and interpersonal skills. Nursing students, participants, and other key stakeholders conducted program evaluation using multiple methods and triangulation of sources. Results and Conclusions: Results indicated the program was effective in providing high levels of support from mentors and peers, effective skills in decision-making, mood management, and interpersonal communication, and higher levels of community involvement. Implications: Findings support the effectiveness of this community based prevention program for high risk youth. Continued research to study the efficacy of this multi-level intervention with other similar groups is indicated.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:10Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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