2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163807
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Youth Empowerment Project: A Community-Based Course
Author(s):
Childs, Janis
Author Details:
Janis Childs, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing & Health Professions, Portland, Maine, USA, email: jchilds@usm.maine.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this course was to introduce students to beliefs, values and communities different from their own and to teach them the value of partnership between academia and community. Specific Aims: To build and implement an interdisciplinary community-based course which provided students with the opportunity to work with inner city youth developing, implementing, and evaluating an HIV and substance abuse prevention program. Problem: Nursing offers individuals many and varied challenges. One of the most difficult is the dissonance between the nurse's values and those of people in communities unlike their own. It is the role of nursing educators to create opportunities for students to explore their own beliefs and to explore the beliefs and values of others in a way that enables them to interact with acceptance and understanding with those whose values differ. Framework: Research was reviewed in the areas of community-based education and evidence based community intervention. The work of Eggert and Nicholas (Reconnecting Youth) and Hawkins and Catalano (Resiliency Model) supports the framework. Community-based nursing education and its tenets are supported by Peggy S. Matteson, Community-Based Nursing Education: The Experience of Eight Schools of Nursing. Methods: This community-based course was developed by the partnering of a university, a high risk neighborhood within the community and the police department. The course teamed university students from nursing as well as other disciplines together with youth for weekly outings, engaging in developmentally tailored activities both outside and within the neighborhood. Students implemented multiple evidence-based practices including positive role modeling, social skills training and community service towards reducing the community multiple risk factors and enhancing several protective factors. Specifically, they focused on building self esteem, developing personal problem-solving skills, improving interpersonal communication, decreasing levels of anger and depression, and utilizing rules and structure to guide health and positive life styles. Students also evaluated the outcomes of their interventions. Results and Conclusion: Students personally experienced the effects of prevention programming in a context of poverty, disorganized family units and weak community support. Students learned to collaborate with police, schools, public health nurses, churches, and students from other academic disciplines. The student experience was described using exemplars from their weekly logs. Students described the course as enlightening, far reaching, and even life changing. Students gained a better understanding of the effects of poverty on individuals and groups. Implications for Practice: The course introduced students to individuals and communities outside of their own cultural experience. Working in and with the community served to sensitize students to the experience of people living in poverty. This course also created a bridge between the University and the community, offering an opportunity for the institution to give something to the community and the community to give something to the university.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Youth Empowerment Project: A Community-Based Courseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChilds, Janisen_US
dc.author.detailsJanis Childs, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing & Health Professions, Portland, Maine, USA, email: jchilds@usm.maine.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163807-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this course was to introduce students to beliefs, values and communities different from their own and to teach them the value of partnership between academia and community. Specific Aims: To build and implement an interdisciplinary community-based course which provided students with the opportunity to work with inner city youth developing, implementing, and evaluating an HIV and substance abuse prevention program. Problem: Nursing offers individuals many and varied challenges. One of the most difficult is the dissonance between the nurse's values and those of people in communities unlike their own. It is the role of nursing educators to create opportunities for students to explore their own beliefs and to explore the beliefs and values of others in a way that enables them to interact with acceptance and understanding with those whose values differ. Framework: Research was reviewed in the areas of community-based education and evidence based community intervention. The work of Eggert and Nicholas (Reconnecting Youth) and Hawkins and Catalano (Resiliency Model) supports the framework. Community-based nursing education and its tenets are supported by Peggy S. Matteson, Community-Based Nursing Education: The Experience of Eight Schools of Nursing. Methods: This community-based course was developed by the partnering of a university, a high risk neighborhood within the community and the police department. The course teamed university students from nursing as well as other disciplines together with youth for weekly outings, engaging in developmentally tailored activities both outside and within the neighborhood. Students implemented multiple evidence-based practices including positive role modeling, social skills training and community service towards reducing the community multiple risk factors and enhancing several protective factors. Specifically, they focused on building self esteem, developing personal problem-solving skills, improving interpersonal communication, decreasing levels of anger and depression, and utilizing rules and structure to guide health and positive life styles. Students also evaluated the outcomes of their interventions. Results and Conclusion: Students personally experienced the effects of prevention programming in a context of poverty, disorganized family units and weak community support. Students learned to collaborate with police, schools, public health nurses, churches, and students from other academic disciplines. The student experience was described using exemplars from their weekly logs. Students described the course as enlightening, far reaching, and even life changing. Students gained a better understanding of the effects of poverty on individuals and groups. Implications for Practice: The course introduced students to individuals and communities outside of their own cultural experience. Working in and with the community served to sensitize students to the experience of people living in poverty. This course also created a bridge between the University and the community, offering an opportunity for the institution to give something to the community and the community to give something to the university.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:11Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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