2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163808
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Youth Empowerment Project: A Teen Girls' Group
Author(s):
Sepples, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Sepples, PhD, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing & Health Professions, Portland, Maine, USA, email: sepples@usm.maine.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This case study explores a girl-centered primary prevention intervention nestled within an existing program for vulnerable teens. Specific Aims: To evaluate the need for and effectiveness of gender specific intervention within an extant program focused on resiliency and asset development. Interventions included: providing girl-centric social support through mentoring, modeling and behavior monitoring and training in those social skills necessary to negotiate the culture of adolescent girls. The intervention was based on the youth empowerment model (Y.E.M.). Participants in the girls group continued to participate in the broader community service and adventure based program. Framework: Program evaluation identified a need to separate the mixed group of boys and girls ages 10-16 by age and gender. A review of the literature was conducted to consider evidence on girl-centered primary prevention. The literature describes early adolescence as a critical juncture for young girls, identifying an increased risk for self destructive behaviors; girls often act-in rather than acting out. The program had not focused on these behaviors, nor had it provided the requisite education for mentors working with girls to understand their unique vulnerabilities and monitor for self destructive behavior. Methods: The teen-girl group was developed to provide support and to foster problem solving and competency. These skills have been identified as providing protection for girls. Research has identified positive female role models and mentors as critical in the development of social skills and sound decision making among girls. The girls group provided both skills training and mentorship from college-age women. Six teen girls participated in the project. Girls were linked one on one with a college student. Interventions included guided mentorship on issues crucial to girls and participation in a workshop on decision making. Women mentors were given a decision-making skills training adapted from Reconnecting Youth, a program developed by nurses at the University of Washington. Results and Conclusions: While outcome data suggest that the umbrella program has effected perceived social support, improved application of skills and increased feelings of value in the community, findings are from aggregate data and neither separate out interventions aimed at teen girls, nor suggest which effects are related to which intervention. However, case reports from several girls who participated in the teen girl group suggest that the specific intervention aimed at social skills training in terms of conflict management and refusal skills has been an effective tool. College women mentors described the modeling of self-care behaviors and thoughtful decision making as a foundational component of the program. Implications for Nursing Practice: Women who served as mentors gained insight into their own adolescent experience. In mentoring teen girls, these women were asked to highlight their own "best-selves." Women mentors described this process as an epiphany. One teen identified a specific experience where techniques learned initially in this intervention had led to self-promoting choices. The long-term effectiveness of this intervention, and the effects on distal outcomes in the YEM model must continue to be assessed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Youth Empowerment Project: A Teen Girls' Groupen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSepples, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Sepples, PhD, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing & Health Professions, Portland, Maine, USA, email: sepples@usm.maine.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163808-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This case study explores a girl-centered primary prevention intervention nestled within an existing program for vulnerable teens. Specific Aims: To evaluate the need for and effectiveness of gender specific intervention within an extant program focused on resiliency and asset development. Interventions included: providing girl-centric social support through mentoring, modeling and behavior monitoring and training in those social skills necessary to negotiate the culture of adolescent girls. The intervention was based on the youth empowerment model (Y.E.M.). Participants in the girls group continued to participate in the broader community service and adventure based program. Framework: Program evaluation identified a need to separate the mixed group of boys and girls ages 10-16 by age and gender. A review of the literature was conducted to consider evidence on girl-centered primary prevention. The literature describes early adolescence as a critical juncture for young girls, identifying an increased risk for self destructive behaviors; girls often act-in rather than acting out. The program had not focused on these behaviors, nor had it provided the requisite education for mentors working with girls to understand their unique vulnerabilities and monitor for self destructive behavior. Methods: The teen-girl group was developed to provide support and to foster problem solving and competency. These skills have been identified as providing protection for girls. Research has identified positive female role models and mentors as critical in the development of social skills and sound decision making among girls. The girls group provided both skills training and mentorship from college-age women. Six teen girls participated in the project. Girls were linked one on one with a college student. Interventions included guided mentorship on issues crucial to girls and participation in a workshop on decision making. Women mentors were given a decision-making skills training adapted from Reconnecting Youth, a program developed by nurses at the University of Washington. Results and Conclusions: While outcome data suggest that the umbrella program has effected perceived social support, improved application of skills and increased feelings of value in the community, findings are from aggregate data and neither separate out interventions aimed at teen girls, nor suggest which effects are related to which intervention. However, case reports from several girls who participated in the teen girl group suggest that the specific intervention aimed at social skills training in terms of conflict management and refusal skills has been an effective tool. College women mentors described the modeling of self-care behaviors and thoughtful decision making as a foundational component of the program. Implications for Nursing Practice: Women who served as mentors gained insight into their own adolescent experience. In mentoring teen girls, these women were asked to highlight their own "best-selves." Women mentors described this process as an epiphany. One teen identified a specific experience where techniques learned initially in this intervention had led to self-promoting choices. The long-term effectiveness of this intervention, and the effects on distal outcomes in the YEM model must continue to be assessed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:12Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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