Assessment Of Relationships Among Learned Helplessness, Self-Esteem And Environmental Factors In An Inner City Latina Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163810
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment Of Relationships Among Learned Helplessness, Self-Esteem And Environmental Factors In An Inner City Latina Population
Author(s):
Quinless, Frances
Author Details:
Frances Quinless, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: wardfr@umdnj.edu
Abstract:
A Latino community-based organization, and local collegiate School of Nursing, conducted a grassroots neighborhood needs assessment in 1996 in an inner city. Questionnaires were returned from over 600 residents and interviews were conducted with ten (10) focus groups. These methods were employed to determine residents' perceptions of their needs - social, health, welfare, housing, employment, educational, and spiritual. Latina women had a surprisingly singular voice regarding perceptions of their needs. Major concerns described included domestic and youth violence, unemployment and lack of English-speaking and writing skills, and chronic neighborhood health problems, including addiction, asthma HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, and women's health issues. Many women described "feeling blue" or "chronic sadness" as barriers to quality lifestyles. Subsequent to this assessment, a research program designed to investigate depression, as measured by the construct learned helplessness, was conducted among these Latina women. Data on learned helplessness, self-esteem, hopelessness, and environmental factors were obtained from a final sample of 32 Latinas with an average age of 32 years. Results indicated significant correlation's between learned helplessness (LH) (as a diagnostic screening instrument for clinical depression) and self-esteem (SE) (r= -0.6808, p = 0.0001) and between learned helplessness and hopelessness (HLN) (as a concurrent validation construct for learned helplessness) (R=0.8313, p=0.0000). The mean score on LH in this group (43.7) was higher than that obtained for two normative samples (39.1 in 229 college age students and 39.8 in 241 healthy adults). However, the LH score was similar to those obtained for clinical samples of oncology and hemodialysis patients (44.5 and 41.9, respectively). Given the attributes ascribed to the behaviors consistent with learned helplessness, these findings gave rise to programs to assist Latinas overcome situational variables possibly associated with learned helplessness. An English language skills program was developed to empower Latinas by increasing employment potential. A women's health nurse practitioner was employed to provide on-site gynecological care, primary care, and family planning. Lastly, an environmental scientist was consulted to explore possible relationships among Latinas' psychological traits and environmental variables in their specific streets. In summary, this research program emanated from a grassroots community needs assessment program and resulted in the implementation of targeted educational and health programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment Of Relationships Among Learned Helplessness, Self-Esteem And Environmental Factors In An Inner City Latina Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuinless, Francesen_US
dc.author.detailsFrances Quinless, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: wardfr@umdnj.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163810-
dc.description.abstractA Latino community-based organization, and local collegiate School of Nursing, conducted a grassroots neighborhood needs assessment in 1996 in an inner city. Questionnaires were returned from over 600 residents and interviews were conducted with ten (10) focus groups. These methods were employed to determine residents' perceptions of their needs - social, health, welfare, housing, employment, educational, and spiritual. Latina women had a surprisingly singular voice regarding perceptions of their needs. Major concerns described included domestic and youth violence, unemployment and lack of English-speaking and writing skills, and chronic neighborhood health problems, including addiction, asthma HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, and women's health issues. Many women described "feeling blue" or "chronic sadness" as barriers to quality lifestyles. Subsequent to this assessment, a research program designed to investigate depression, as measured by the construct learned helplessness, was conducted among these Latina women. Data on learned helplessness, self-esteem, hopelessness, and environmental factors were obtained from a final sample of 32 Latinas with an average age of 32 years. Results indicated significant correlation's between learned helplessness (LH) (as a diagnostic screening instrument for clinical depression) and self-esteem (SE) (r= -0.6808, p = 0.0001) and between learned helplessness and hopelessness (HLN) (as a concurrent validation construct for learned helplessness) (R=0.8313, p=0.0000). The mean score on LH in this group (43.7) was higher than that obtained for two normative samples (39.1 in 229 college age students and 39.8 in 241 healthy adults). However, the LH score was similar to those obtained for clinical samples of oncology and hemodialysis patients (44.5 and 41.9, respectively). Given the attributes ascribed to the behaviors consistent with learned helplessness, these findings gave rise to programs to assist Latinas overcome situational variables possibly associated with learned helplessness. An English language skills program was developed to empower Latinas by increasing employment potential. A women's health nurse practitioner was employed to provide on-site gynecological care, primary care, and family planning. Lastly, an environmental scientist was consulted to explore possible relationships among Latinas' psychological traits and environmental variables in their specific streets. In summary, this research program emanated from a grassroots community needs assessment program and resulted in the implementation of targeted educational and health programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:14Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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