2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163811
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program
Author(s):
Burke, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Burke,PhD, RN, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: burkekm@umdnj.edu
Abstract:
An Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program (APPP) was initiated by the school of Nursing to address the concern of teen-age pregnancy in urban areas in NJ. This program consists of multiple teaching methods: interactive discussion, role playing, and a parenting simulation using the "Baby Think it Over." There are five educational modules: "Parenting Pros and Cons;" "Baby Think It Over Simulation;" "Abstinence;" "Reducing Risky Behaviors;" and "Pregnancy Prevention." It was hypothesized that participation in the Adolescent Pregnancy Program would result in adolescent's having: 1) altered attitudes about the realities of parenting; 2) increased knowledge about risky sexual behavior; and 3) increased knowledge about pregnancy prevention. Seventy-five male and female adolescents between the ages of 12-14 participated in the program. All were students in urban schools located in Camden and Newark. Parental and student consents were collected prior to participation in the program. Attitudes and knowledge were measured by pre and posttests administered to the adolescents. These tests were created by the nurse practitioners at the School of Nursing. The pre-tests were administered immediately before the educational presentation. Posttests for the educational component were administered upon completion of the presentation, and the posttest of the parenting simulation was given upon return of the "babies." Scores for the pre and posttests were analyzed using SPSS 10. Additionally, anecdotal notes of instructors were compiled. Results demonstrated that participation did shift attitudes toward a more realistic view of parenting. This was especially noted in the areas of perceived lifestyle changes due to parenting. After the baby simulator experience there were changes noted in the adolescent's perceptions of available time fore sleep, eating, television viewing, homework time, time for school, time for friends, and time for sports. Of special interest to the investigators was the pre-test result of 70.7% of adolescents stating that parenting would impact on time for school. After the simulator experience 100% stated that parenting would impact on school. These adolescents also demonstrated a 10% increase in the willingness to abstain from sex. Upon completion of Module 4 there was an increase in their knowledge of risky sexual behavior with 100% of participants correctly identifying high-risk behaviors and stating that "sex is risky." There was no significant difference in the group's knowledge of pregnancy prevention. This project is ongoing. In summary, a multiple teaching methods program such as the APPP has been shown to have at least a short-term effect on attitudes and knowledge associated with realities of parenting. Follow-up is planned to determine long term effects of the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Pregnancy Prevention Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Burke,PhD, RN, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: burkekm@umdnj.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163811-
dc.description.abstractAn Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program (APPP) was initiated by the school of Nursing to address the concern of teen-age pregnancy in urban areas in NJ. This program consists of multiple teaching methods: interactive discussion, role playing, and a parenting simulation using the "Baby Think it Over." There are five educational modules: "Parenting Pros and Cons;" "Baby Think It Over Simulation;" "Abstinence;" "Reducing Risky Behaviors;" and "Pregnancy Prevention." It was hypothesized that participation in the Adolescent Pregnancy Program would result in adolescent's having: 1) altered attitudes about the realities of parenting; 2) increased knowledge about risky sexual behavior; and 3) increased knowledge about pregnancy prevention. Seventy-five male and female adolescents between the ages of 12-14 participated in the program. All were students in urban schools located in Camden and Newark. Parental and student consents were collected prior to participation in the program. Attitudes and knowledge were measured by pre and posttests administered to the adolescents. These tests were created by the nurse practitioners at the School of Nursing. The pre-tests were administered immediately before the educational presentation. Posttests for the educational component were administered upon completion of the presentation, and the posttest of the parenting simulation was given upon return of the "babies." Scores for the pre and posttests were analyzed using SPSS 10. Additionally, anecdotal notes of instructors were compiled. Results demonstrated that participation did shift attitudes toward a more realistic view of parenting. This was especially noted in the areas of perceived lifestyle changes due to parenting. After the baby simulator experience there were changes noted in the adolescent's perceptions of available time fore sleep, eating, television viewing, homework time, time for school, time for friends, and time for sports. Of special interest to the investigators was the pre-test result of 70.7% of adolescents stating that parenting would impact on time for school. After the simulator experience 100% stated that parenting would impact on school. These adolescents also demonstrated a 10% increase in the willingness to abstain from sex. Upon completion of Module 4 there was an increase in their knowledge of risky sexual behavior with 100% of participants correctly identifying high-risk behaviors and stating that "sex is risky." There was no significant difference in the group's knowledge of pregnancy prevention. This project is ongoing. In summary, a multiple teaching methods program such as the APPP has been shown to have at least a short-term effect on attitudes and knowledge associated with realities of parenting. Follow-up is planned to determine long term effects of the intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:15Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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