A Sex-Based Comparison Of The Symptom Experience Of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163812
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Sex-Based Comparison Of The Symptom Experience Of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI)
Author(s):
Zuzelo, Patti
Author Details:
Patti Zuzelo, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zuzelo@lasalle.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the symptom experience of AMI for women and men and to compare this symptom experience based on sex in order to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the AMI symptom experience. The research questions of this study are: What is the symptom experience of women and men who are admitted to a cardiac care unit with a diagnosis of AMI? What are the meanings and essences of the experience? What are the differences in the AMI symptom experience of men and women? The participants were Caucasian women (N=10) and men (N=10) diagnosed with AMI. The interview began with the open-ended question, "Tell me what your symptoms were like when you had your heart attack?" Prompters were used to obtain an exhaustive description of the symptom experience. The interviews were audio-tape recorded and transcribed. The transcriptions were thematically analyzed using the strategies outlined by Colaizzi (1978). Themes were arranged beginning with the most significant experience from the perspective of the participants. Themes for the women included: feeling fatigued, feeling breathing distress, having chest symptoms, having back and arm pain, feeling body temperature changes, having distressing gastrointestinal symptoms, and setting priorities. Themes for the men included: feeling chest sensations, changing breathing patterns, having upper limb pain and numbness, noticing head and neck symptoms, having gastrointestinal distress, trying to make sense of symptoms, and getting help. There were sex-based differences and similarities in the AMI symptom experience. The women felt overwhelmingly fatigued while men were not as tired. Women made certain that their role responsibilities as mother and wife were addressed prior to seeking medical intervention. Men were more active in directing their need for care. Men also perspired heavily during their AMI. Women noticed back pain. There were breathing differences between women and men and also differences in jaw and mouth sensations. Study findings supported those of other researchers and offered new detail to the description of the AMI symptom experience. Neither men nor women appreciated the individuality of AMI symptoms. Rather, they tended to look for "classic" signs and symptoms, thereby, at times, delaying treatment. It may be that the individuality of the symptom experience should be included in teaching plans. The results of this study could also be used to develop AMI assessment checklists that are sex-specific. Future studies are needed that explore the AMI symptom experience of non-Caucasian people.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Sex-Based Comparison Of The Symptom Experience Of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorZuzelo, Pattien_US
dc.author.detailsPatti Zuzelo, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zuzelo@lasalle.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163812-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the symptom experience of AMI for women and men and to compare this symptom experience based on sex in order to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the AMI symptom experience. The research questions of this study are: What is the symptom experience of women and men who are admitted to a cardiac care unit with a diagnosis of AMI? What are the meanings and essences of the experience? What are the differences in the AMI symptom experience of men and women? The participants were Caucasian women (N=10) and men (N=10) diagnosed with AMI. The interview began with the open-ended question, "Tell me what your symptoms were like when you had your heart attack?" Prompters were used to obtain an exhaustive description of the symptom experience. The interviews were audio-tape recorded and transcribed. The transcriptions were thematically analyzed using the strategies outlined by Colaizzi (1978). Themes were arranged beginning with the most significant experience from the perspective of the participants. Themes for the women included: feeling fatigued, feeling breathing distress, having chest symptoms, having back and arm pain, feeling body temperature changes, having distressing gastrointestinal symptoms, and setting priorities. Themes for the men included: feeling chest sensations, changing breathing patterns, having upper limb pain and numbness, noticing head and neck symptoms, having gastrointestinal distress, trying to make sense of symptoms, and getting help. There were sex-based differences and similarities in the AMI symptom experience. The women felt overwhelmingly fatigued while men were not as tired. Women made certain that their role responsibilities as mother and wife were addressed prior to seeking medical intervention. Men were more active in directing their need for care. Men also perspired heavily during their AMI. Women noticed back pain. There were breathing differences between women and men and also differences in jaw and mouth sensations. Study findings supported those of other researchers and offered new detail to the description of the AMI symptom experience. Neither men nor women appreciated the individuality of AMI symptoms. Rather, they tended to look for "classic" signs and symptoms, thereby, at times, delaying treatment. It may be that the individuality of the symptom experience should be included in teaching plans. The results of this study could also be used to develop AMI assessment checklists that are sex-specific. Future studies are needed that explore the AMI symptom experience of non-Caucasian people.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:16Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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